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Climate Change, Inequality and Social Policy
A new interdisciplinary seminar series starting in Autumn 2016

Three institutes in LSE are hosting a new seminar series: the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (GRI), the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and the new International Inequalities Institute (III). It will be chaired by Prof Ian Gough, Visiting Professor at CASE and Associate at Grantham.

The overlap between environmental pressures and degradation on the one hand and the ‘social dimension’ of inequality and human wellbeing on the other hand is of immense importance but under-researched. There is a yawning gap to be filled by a coherent, exciting and interdisciplinary research agenda. This series of seminars will explore and develop that agenda.  

 The seminars will be focused in two ways: on global warming and climate change rather than a wider range of environmental problems, and on the UK and other rich countries - the ‘welfare states’ of the OECD, roughly the same as and the Kyoto Annex II countries.

The first six seminars of the series will take place onThursday 3rd November 2016, 12.00-13.30 with Prof Ian Gough on ‘Climate change, Inequality and Social Policy’. Registration is required. Sign up for this seminar.


News Posted: 22 August 2016      [Back to the Top]

North-South economic and social divide still growing
suggests new CASE and University of Manchester research

The analysis suggests that the economic divergence between London and the Northern regions in England continues to grow. The gaps are also growing in relation to a number of social outcomes, such as education and health, with improvement in these outcomes in London being in line with economic conditions in the capital bouncing back to pre-recession levels or beyond while the North lags behind. But economic growth in London has not resulted in reduced poverty or inequality. The full paper is available here: Pulling in the Same Direction? Economic and Social Outcomes in London and the North of England Since the Recession, by Polina Obolenskaya, Ruth Lupton and Bert Provan.


News Posted: 02 August 2016      [Back to the Top]

Our research for the Papworth Trust and Habinteg
highlights a hidden housing market for 1.8m disabled people

New findings show a significant demand for accessible housing to rent and buy. Conducted by LSE Housing and Communities (CASE) and Ipsos MORI, the report, The hidden housing market, uncovers a fresh view that challenges assumptions about the potential for disabled people to buy their own home. The report also sheds light on the wider appeal of homes that deliver higher quality accessible features.

Headline findings:

  • 1.8 million disabled people have an unmet housing need – 580,000 of whom are of working age (there are 11.6 million disabled people in the UK)

  • Of the 1.8 million disabled people needing accessible homes, 56% are home owners with 39% having incomes in the top half of the income distribution

  • 19% of the British public would most favour moving to a different property specifically designed or adapted to enable them to live independently in later life

  • Impact of unmet housing need for accessible housing – disabled people living in inaccessible homes are four times more likely to be unemployed.

The report also demonstrates some of the profound effects on working age disabled people of not having their need for accessible housing met, including an impact on health and wellbeing, the ability to engage in community life and, crucially, the employment market. For more information see the full CASE research report No Place Like An Accessible Home: Quality of life and opportunity for disabled people with accessible housing needs.


News Posted: 01 August 2016      [Back to the Top]


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