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LSE Housing and Communities Book Launch
Cities for a Small Continent: International Handbook of City Recovery by Professor Anne Power

LSE Housing and Communities, with support from La Fabrique de la Cité invites you to the launch of Anne Power's latest publication 'Cities for a Small Continent'. This book draws together 10 years of ground-level research into the ways Europe's ex-industrial cities are treading new paths in sustainability. Anne Power uses seven case-study cities to detail how and why city change happens, and how cities in the world's smallest, most crowded, most city-loving continent can build a more viable, balanced and sustainable urban future.

Download the Book Order Form here - £15 Special Launch Price Until 30th June 2016

Listen to the podcast:


Chaired by Professor Ricky Burdett, this event will explore the causes and consequences of urban challenges in post-industrial European cities and the potential that their model offers in creating more sustainable cities. Bruce Katz of the Brookings Institution will situate this study in a US-context whilst Anne Power will set out the European perspective. Speakers confirmed are:
  • Professor Ricky Burdett, LSE Cities
  • Professor Anne Power, LSE Housing and Communities and Professor of Social Policy
  • Bruce Katz, Centennial Scholar at the Brookings Institution
Cities for a Small Continent will be available to buy at the event. There will also be an opportunity to have your book signed by Anne Power and Bruce Katz.

The event is free but booking is essential. Please RSVP to lsehousingandcommunities@lse.ac.uk to register your interest.

Old Theatre, Old Building, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 3PH

LSE Housing Special Event

News Posted: 24 May 2016      [Back to the Top]

Sanctions and inequalities: what do we know and need to know about the impact of benefit sanctions
on particular groups?

 

CASE and UK Administrative Justice Institute (UKAJI) jointly held a seminar with a panel discussion on 16th March 2016.

 

It brought together three speakers who have investigated different aspects of the impact of sanctions, and provided the opportunity for participants to discuss the evidence and gaps in our knowledge. Presentation slides and associated papers are available below.

 

Speakers:

Anne Power (CASE, LSE)

How are sanctions hitting people’s lives? Community-level evidence

 

Aaron Reeves (International Inequalities Institute, LSE)

Does applying sanctions to unemployment benefit recipients increase welfare exit and employment? A cross-area analysis of UK sanctioning reforms  download here

Working paper: Do punitive approaches to unemployment benefit recipients increase welfare exit and employment? download here

 

David Webster (University of Glasgow)

Sanctions: The Missing Evidence download here

Listen to the presentations here  

 

Discussants: Michael Adler (University of Edinburgh) and Maurice Sunkin (UKAJI)

Notes from the session available to download here

Listen to the discussion here


News Posted: 16 March 2016      [Back to the Top]

Date for your diary: 27th April
What was the impact of the Coalition government on social policy outcomes and welfare governance?

Venue: London School of Economics, Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House
Wednesday 27th April 2016, 3.00 - 6.00 pm, followed by a drinks reception

Speakers:  Professor Hugh Bochel, Professor Sir John Hills, Professor Ruth Lupton, Professor Martin Powell, Dr Polly Vizard

Respondents: Nick Timmins 
(The King's Fund, Institute for Government, former public policy editor at the Financial Times) and Peter Taylor Gooby (Research Professor of Social Policy at the University of Kent)

Chair: Professor Coretta Phillips 

This event will launch two new complementary publications analysing UK social policy from 2010 to 2015.  Hugh Bochel and Martin Powell will introduce The Coalition government and social policy: restructuring the welfare state and Ruth Lupton will present on the key findings from Social Policy in a Cold Climate: policies and their consequences since the crisisPolly Vizard and Martin Powell will jointly present on “What happened in health services? John Hills will then lead a short commentary to be followed by a discussion led by the respondents Nick Timmins and Peter Taylor-Gooby. There will then be an opportunity for questions from the audience.

Hugh Bochel is Professor of Public Policy at the University of Lincoln. 

John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy, Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and Co-Director of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE.

Ruth Lupton is Professor of Education at the University of Manchester. 

Martin Powell is Professor of Health and Social Policy, University of Birmingham.

Coretta Phillips is An Associate Professor of Social Policy at the LSE

Dr Polly Vizard is a Associate Professorial Research Fellow at CASE, LSE.

This event is free and open to all please register your interest by email to case@lse.ac.uk


News Posted: 03 March 2016      [Back to the Top]

Moving the Goalposts: Poverty and Access
to Sport for Young People

Monday 7th December 2015

 

LSE Housing and Communities recently launched a new report: Moving the Goalposts: Poverty and Access to Sport for Young People. Earlier in the year we carried out area-based qualitative research for StreetGames, the leading charity working to break down the barriers created by poverty and area disadvantage that prevent young people participating in sport.

 

Professor David Piachaud Chaired this important event where Jane Ashworth, Chief Executive of StreetGames explained why this research is so important. Professor Anne Power presented the main findings and recommendations and Sir Robin Wales, Mayor of Newham and Baroness Tessa Jowell also offered their perspectives on the importance of sport for London's young people.


Download the report:

Full Report (pdf) | Executive Summary (pdf) | Literature Review (pdf)

 

Audio recording of the launch event

Moving The Goalposts Report

StreetGames asked us to help them better understand why high poverty areas suffer such major disadvantages and throw up so many barriers in the field of 'active learning' and whether informal sport and physical activity could actually help.
 
We visited five deprived areas in England and Wales and spoke to about 135 young people between the ages of 14-25, local parents and key actors in order to uncover what young people do, what they think of their area, why they play sport or don’t, and what the barriers to involvement are. We know that sport and physical activity help young people develop confidence and motivation, social and team skills, and also motivates them to strive and succeed.
 
The health impacts of lack of exercise are already serious and projected to become more so in the future. This relevant and timely report offers a unique insight into the lives of young people in deprived areas, the barriers they face to participation, ways in which communities and charities can support the work already done in poor areas, and new ways of opening access to sport for young people.
 

Further information: For more information contact Nicola Serle at LSE (n.serle@lse.ac.uk) Tel: 020 7955 6684.


News Posted: 16 November 2015      [Back to the Top]


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