Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) LSE RSS Contact Us YouTube Twitter

Michaelmas 2019

Wednesday  11 September 2019  18:00 - 19:30
Note change in Time


Social Contracts for the 21st Century

Minouche Shafik (Director, LSE)

Register here to attend


LSE India Observatory IG Patel Lecture
Thursday  19 September 2019  09:30 - 18:00

CEPR, STICERD, Marshall Institute and Rustandy Center Joint Conference

Various Speakers 

The London School of Economics (STICERD and Marshall Institute), the University of Chicago Booth School of Business (Rustandy Center) and the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) invite you to the joint conference on: Economics of Social Sector Organisations (ESSO), Entrepreneurship Economics (ENT), Incentives, Management and Organisation (IMO) on 19-20 September 2019. Organisers: Nava Ashraf (LSE and CEPR), Oriana Bandiera (LSE and CEPR), Catherine Thomas (LSE and CEPR). Keynote paper will be given by John Van Reenen (LSE).


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Special Events
Tuesday  24 September 2019  14:00 - 15:30
Note change in Time


Sleepless in Chennai: The Consequences of Increasing Sleep among the Urban Poor

Gautam Rao (Harvard University) , joint with Pedro Bessone, Frank Schilbach, Heather Schofield, and Mattie Toma

This paper measures the prevalence and consequences of sleep deprivation among the urban poor in India. We find that low-income adults in Chennai sleep little and poorly:  5.6 hours of objectively-measured sleep per night, despite 8 hours in bed. Their sleep can be increased substantially: randomized treatments providing simple devices, encouragement, (and for some) financial incentives increase night sleep by over 30 minutes. Offering short naps at the workplace in the afternoon also increased daily sleep. However, increased  night sleep had no detectable effects on cognition, productivity or labor supply, economic decisions, or physical health.  In contrast, naps improved cognition, subjective well-being and labor productivity. Naps also reduced present bias and inattention, and marginally increased financial savings. Our results provide a possible explanation for the persistence of widespread sleep deprivation and the relatively high prevalence of afternoon naps in many developing countries.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Psychology and Economics Seminar
Thursday  26 September 2019  12:30 - 14:00
Note change in Time


New approach to distribution-free testing for Markov chains

Estate Khmaladze (Victoria University of Wellington)

Consider an empirical process, in any one of statistical contexts, and then apply unitary operator to this processes. Can one say what good could come out of this, and why will it be useful? The answer is that probably one can, as it leads us to a new point of view on distribution-free testing of probabilistic models. The specific answer in the case of parametric families of discrete distributions was described in 2013. For parametric empirical processes in $\R^d$ the approach was described in 2016. In this talk we will show two further examples: how can we have a theory of distribution-free tests for transition matrices of Markov chains, and, if we have time enough, and if my colleagues will find it of interest, how can we test regression model in the way, which does not depend on covariates


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Friday  04 October 2019  12:00 - 13:00

The Colourblind Problem

Estate Khmaladze (Victoria University of Wellington)

32L B.11, Basement, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


Joint Econometrics and Statistics Workshop
Tuesday  08 October 2019  17:00 - 18:00
Note change in Time


Hydro Power and The Power of People in India

Subrat Kumar Sahu, joint with Grantham Research Institute

Register here to attend


LSE India Observatory Seminar


For further information please contact india.observatory@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 7615.
Tuesday  08 October 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Obfuscating Ownership

Scott Gehlbach (University of Chicago)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Tuesday  15 October 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Sexual harassment and gender inequality in the labor market

Johanna Rickne (Stockholm)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Wednesday  16 October 2019  16:30 - 18:00

How the Reification of Merit Breeds Inequality: Theory and Experimental Evidence

Fabien Accominotti (London School of Economics)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Social Exclusion Seminars
Tuesday  22 October 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Making policies matter: Voter responses to campaign promises

Cesi Cruz (University of British Columbia)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Wednesday  23 October 2019  16:30 - 18:00

Social Policy and Distributional Outcomes (SPDO) event: Homelessness and complex needs

Suzanne Fitzpatrick (I-SPHERE, Heriot-Watt University) , joint with Glen Bramley (Heriot-Watt University)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Social Exclusion Seminars
Monday  28 October 2019  12:30 - 14:00

Common Ownership in America: 1980-2017; and Testing for Common Ownership (joint with Matthew Backus and Christopher Conlon)

Michael Sinkinson (Yale)

When competing firms possess overlapping sets of investors, maximizing shareholder value may provide incentives that distort competitive behavior, affecting pricing, entry, contracting, and virtually all strategic interactions among firms. We propose a structurally consistent and scaleable approach to the measurement of this phenomenon for the universe of S&P 500 firms between 1980 and 2017. Contrary to popular intuition, this is not primarily associated with the rise of BlackRock and Vanguard: instead, the trend in the time series is driven by a broader rise in diversified investment strategies, of which these firms are only the most recent incarnation. In the cross-section, there is substantial variation that can be traced, both in the theory and the data, to observable firm characteristics. We show how common ownership can theoretically give rise to incentives for expropriation of undiversified shareholders via tunneling. Finally, we develop a framework for testing for price effects of common ownership in differentiated goods markets. We apply this test to the US market for ready-to-eat cereals.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Tuesday  29 October 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Propaganda, Conspiracy Theories, and Accountability in Fragile Democracies

Ken Schotts (Graduate School of Business, Stanford University)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Thursday  31 October 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Acquisition of/Stochastic Evidence

Bart Lipman (Boston)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Monday  04 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

What do Nudges Really Do? New Evidence from Over 100 Trials

Stefano DellaVigna (Berkeley)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Tuesday  05 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Representation Failure

Sergio Montero (University of Rochester)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Thursday  07 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Identification of possibly nonfundamental Structural VARMA models using higher order moments

Carlos Velasco (UC3, Madrid)

We use information from higher order moments to achieve identification of non-Gaussian structural vector autoregressive moving average (SVARMA) models, possibly non-fundamental. We introduce a frequency domain criterion to identify the location of the roots of the lag matrix polynomials based on higher order cumulants dynamics. This information also provides identification on the rotation of the model errors leading to the structural innovations up to sign and permutation. We develop general representations of the higher order spectral density arrays of vector linear processes and describe sufficient conditions for global and local parameter identification that rely on simple rank conditions on the linear dynamics and on moment implications of the independence component assumption on the vector of structural innovations. We generalize previous univariate asymptotic analysis to develop asymptotically normal and efficient estimates exploiting second and higher order dynamics.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  07 November 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Inferring Cognitive Heterogeneity from Aggregate Choices

Paola Manzini (University of Sussex) , joint with Valentino Dardanoni, Marco Mariotti and Chris Tyson

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Monday  11 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

The bigger the better? Using lotteries to identify the allocative efficiency effects of firm size

Dave Donaldson (MIT)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Monday  11 November 2019  12:30 - 14:00

TBC

Yizhou Jin (Berkeley)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Tuesday  12 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Jorg Spenkuch (Northwestern University)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Thursday  14 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Inference for the mean

Ulrich Mueller (Princeton University)

Consider inference about the mean of a population with finite variance, based on an i.i.d. sample. The usual t-statistic yields correct inference in large samples, but heavy tails induce poor small sample behavior. This paper combines extreme value theory for the smallest and largest observations with a normal approximation for the t-statistic of a truncated sample to obtain more accurate inference. This alternative approximation is shown to provide a refinement over the standard normal approximation to the full sample t-statistic under more than two but less than three moments, while the bootstrap does not. Small sample simulations suggest substantial size improvements over the bootstrap, also in an application to linear regression inference with clustered standard errors


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  14 November 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Compromise, don't optimize: A prior-free alternative to Bayesian Nash equilibrium

Andriy Zapachelnyuk (University of St Andrews) , joint with Karl Schlag

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Monday  18 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Scaling Up Agricultural Policy Interventions: Theory and Evidence from Uganda

Benjamin Faber (University of California, Berkeley)

Interventions aimed at raising agricultural productivity in developing countries have been a centerpiece in the global fight against poverty. Much of the recent evidence in this space has been based on randomized control trials (RCTs), with the well-known limitation that findings from local interventions generally do not speak to the general equilibrium (GE) effects if the policy were to be scaled up. In this paper, we study these forces through the lens of a quantitative GE model of farm production and trade that we develop to capture several stylized facts in this setting. We propose a new solution approach in this environment that allows us to study high-dimensional GE counterfactuals at the level of individual households in the macroeconomy. We then bring to bear rich administrative microdata to calibrate the model to the roughly 6 million households populating Uganda. We use these building blocks to explore the average and distributional implications of small-scale interventions compared to policies at scale, and quantify the underlying mechanisms.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Monday  18 November 2019  12:30 - 14:00

TBC

Robert Clark (Queen's University)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Tuesday  19 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Marco Tabellini (Harvard Business School)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Thursday  21 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Stefan Wager (Stanford)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  21 November 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Blackwell Equilibria

Costas Cavounidas (University of Warwick)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Monday  25 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Trade and Informality in the Presence of Labor Market Frictions and Regulations

Gabriel Ulyssea (Oxford)

Motivated by recent work on the labor market effects of trade, we build a model of trade with labor market frictions and regulations that are not perfectly enforced by the government. Heterogeneous firms decide whether to operate formally or informally, allowing for a link between globalization, informality and unemployment. We estimate the model using several data sources from Brazil, including matched employer-employee data from formal and informal firms and workers. We perform counterfactual analyses to understand how increasing trade openness affects informality, unemployment and welfare under different scenarios of labor market regulations and levels of enforcement. Our results suggest that domestic policies leading to a reduction in informality have the potential to strongly increase aggregate productivity and welfare, at the expense of modest increases in unemployment. These policies have a much larger effect on welfare relative to policies aiming to reduce international trade costs. The informal sector works as a buffer in the event of negative economic shocks. However, the welfare gains from eradicating informality are so significant that it is hard to justify lenience toward the informal sector on the basis that it works as a buffer following negative economic shocks.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Monday  25 November 2019  12:30 - 14:00

TBC

Rachel Griffith (IFS and UCL)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Tuesday  26 November 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Volha Charnysh (MIT)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Wednesday  27 November 2019  16:30 - 18:00

A new measure of poverty for the UK: The Social Metrics Commision's approach and results

Mathew Oakley (Social Metrics Commission)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Social Exclusion Seminars
Thursday  28 November 2019  15:30 - 17:00

TBC

Mihai Manea (Stonybrook)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Monday  02 December 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Gangs, Labor Mobility and Development

Maria Micaela Sviatschi (Princeton )

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Tuesday  03 December 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Amanda Clayton (Vanderbilt University)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Thursday  05 December 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Bounds in continuous instrumental variable models

Florian Gunsilius (Michigan)

[pdf] Download Paper


Partial identification approaches have seen a sharp increase in interest in econometrics due to improved flexibility and robustness compared to point-identification approaches. However, formidable computational requirements of existing approaches often offset these undeniable advantages—particularly in general instrumental variable models with continuous variables. This article introduces a computationally tractable method for estimating bounds on functionals of counterfactual distributions in continuous instrumental variable models. Its potential applications include randomized trials with imperfect compliance, the evaluation of social programs and, more generally, simultaneous equations models. The method does not require functional form restrictions a priori, but can incorporate parametric or non-parametric assumptions into the estimation process. It proceeds by solving an infinite dimensional program on the paths of a system of counterfactual stochastic processes in order to obtain the counterfactual bounds. A novel “sampling of paths”- approach provides the practical solution concept and probabilistic approximation guarantees. As a demonstration of its capabilities, the method provides informative non-parametric bounds on household expenditures under the sole assumption that expenditure is continuous,showing that partial identification approaches can yield informative bounds under minimal assumptions. Moreover, it shows that additional monotonicity assumptions lead to considerably tighter bounds, which constitutes a novel assessment of the identificatory strength of such non-parametric assumptions in a unified framework.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  05 December 2019  15:30 - 17:00

TBC

Konrad Mierendorff (UCL)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Monday  09 December 2019  12:00 - 13:30

The Roots of Health Inequality and the Value of Intra-Family Expertise

Petra Persson (Stanford)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Monday  09 December 2019  12:30 - 14:00

TBC

Jonathan Williams (University of North Carolina)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Tuesday  10 December 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Stelios Michalopoulos (Brown University)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Political Science and Political Economy Research Seminar
Wednesday  11 December 2019  16:30 - 18:00

Social Policy and Distributional Outcomes (SPDO) event: Compulsory Education: policies, spending and outcomes

Ruth Lupton (University of Manchester) , joint with Polina Obolenskaya (London School of Economics)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Social Exclusion Seminars
Thursday  12 December 2019  14:00 - 15:30

TBC

Vira Semenova (Berkeley)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  12 December 2019  15:30 - 17:00

TBC

Ludovic Renou (QMUL)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
  
<<October 2019 >>
smtwtfs
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Click on the < < and > > symbols above to go back or forward a month.

Alternatively choose a month from below: