Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) LSE RSS Contact Us YouTube Twitter

Summer 2019

Wednesday  03 April 2019  12:45 - 14:00

The Rise in Single-Mother Families and Children’s Cognitive Development: evidence from the 1958, 1970 and 2000 British Birth Cohorts

Susan Harkness (University of Bristol)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
Monday  29 April 2019  12:00 - 13:30

CANCELLED

Supreet Kaur (Berkeley)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Wednesday  01 May 2019  12:30 - 13:45

TBC

Dmitry Taubinsky (University of California, Berkeley)

IFS, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE


IFS-STICERD Public Economics Seminar
Thursday  02 May 2019  14:15 - 15:45
Note change in Time


Implied Stochastic Volatility Models

Yacine Ait-Sahalia (Princeton University) , joint with Chenxu Li - Peking University - Guanghua School of Management Chen Xu Li - Princeton University - Bendheim Center for Finance

[pdf] Download Paper


This paper proposes to build "implied stochastic volatility models" designed to fit option-implied volatility data, and implements a method to construct such models. The method is based on explicitly linking shape characteristics of the implied volatility surface to the specification of the stochastic volatility model. We propose and implement parametric and nonparametric versions of implied stochastic volatility models


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  02 May 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Normative Equilibrium: The permissible and the forbidden as devices for bringing order to economic environments

Ariel Rubinstein (Tel-Aviv University and New York University) , joint with Michael Richter

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Friday  03 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Evaluating the French R&D tax credit scheme

Nicholas Chanut (Department of Economics, LSE)

Tax credits to firms conducting R&D is a widespread fiscal incentive in developed countries. Since its major overhaul in 2008, the French "Research Tax Credit" has become the most generous of such schemes among OECD countries. It targets 25,000 firms annually and costs the French government more than 6 billion euros - about the same as funding for its two major research agencies. This work in progress is a first step towards evaluating the impact of this reform both on the intensive and extensive margin. We combine several sources of administrative data to link tax credit recipients to their innovation and economic outcomes. To disentangle causal effect from self-selection, we present two instruments: variations in local knowledge of the tax credit as proxied by newly established accounting firms, and differential intensity of treatment driven by researchers wage bill.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Wednesday  08 May 2019  12:30 - 14:00
Note change in Time


Emerging Nature of Labour Market in India

KS Hari (Subir Chowdhury Fellow (2018-19) from Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics)

LSE India Observatory Seminar


For further information please contact india.observatory@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 7615.
Wednesday  08 May 2019  09:30 - 18:00

STICERD Morishima Lecture: The Meritocracy Trap

Daniel Markovits (Yale Law School)

Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham.


Old Theatre, Ground Floor, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE


STICERD Special Events
Wednesday  08 May 2019  12:45 - 14:00

Universal Credit In-work Progression Randomised Control Trial

Angelo Valerio (Department of Work and Pensions) , joint with Helen Morrell

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
Thursday  09 May 2019  14:15 - 15:45
Note change in Time


Identification strategies for nonseparable models

Rosa Matzkin (UCLA)

When confronting an economic model with data, one usually encounters a situation where some important variables, such as tastes and productivity that appear in the model in nonadditive, nonseparable ways, are unobserved. Rather than transforming the model into one where the unobservables enter in separable ways, the nonseparable approach considers identification and estimation of the original model. The original model satisfies the economic restrictions of the model, which aid in identification and estimation. These restrictions are often lost in separable transformations. This seminar will cover identification and estimation methods for nonseparable models, with emphasis on nonparametric methods. First, some key econometric techniques used in nonseparable models will be presented. Next, it will be shown how these techniques have been used and extended to study particular econometric models.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Friday  10 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Tastes, expectations and gendered jobs: a field experiment with pink-collar men

Alexia Delfino (Department of Economics, LSE)

Taste-based and statistical discrimination theories have been extensively used to explain demand-side determinants of occupational segregation by gender and race. However, evidence on the way these forces affect the supply-side is still limited. To what extent do preferences for co-workers gender versus performance expectations affect minority's decision to apply for a job? To answer this question, I designed and implemented a nationwide recruitment experiment in collaboration with one of the main UK organizations in social care. Men's share in this job has historically been below 25%. I use random variation in emails to potential applicants to manipulate two dimensions: 1) salience of workers' gender (through a male or female photograph) and 2) performance expectations (describing the aggregate performance of two previous cohorts of workers). I find no evidence for a taste-based explanation of men's application decisions. Disclosing information that past performance was poor encourages 14% more men's applications than information of an outstanding past performance. These effects are stronger for men with limited experience in social care. Despite this initial quantity/quality trade-off, the treatment which triggers more applications also attracts men that perform better in the first month on the job. Women apply more when seeing the female than the male photograph and are insensitive to information on average, but this masks heterogeneity depending on the photograph they saw.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Monday  13 May 2019  12:00 - 13:30

CANCELLED

David Card (University of California, Berkeley)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Monday  13 May 2019  12:30 - 14:00

Structuring Subcontracting in Procurement Markets

Elena Krasnokutskaya (Johns Hopkins) , joint with Jorge Balat and Tatiana Komarova

This paper provides a novel evidence (based on a new dataset) on bidding and subcontracting behavior of primary contractors participating in California highway procurement market. We develop a model of procurement auction with subcontracting stage which is capable of rationalizing the patterns documented in the data. Next, we use this framework to evaluate the welfare implications of several alternative subcontracting arrangements that are frequently employed in government procurement.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Monday  13 May 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Essential Concepts of Causal Inference: A remarkable history and an intriguing future

Donald Rubin (Harvard University)

Causal inference is a major topic in any field that tries to understand the kinds of treatments (i.e., interventions) we humans are considering in order to effect particular changes in the world around us, whether those treatments involve business decisions, pharmaceuticals to ingest, educational programs to offer, military actions to take ÿ effectively everything that involves choices in our lives. Despite the ubiquity of this topic to the lives of unconscious and later conscious humans for tens of thousands of years, it has a remarkable history, with solid mathematical foundations beginning only in the early 20th century, with the development of crucial ideas tied to related ideas in physics, namely those arising in quantum mechanics. This formulation of causal inference has an intriguing future because of the increasing application of causal inference to treatments with conscious units, humans, despite its mathematical origins with unconscious units: plants, animals, industrial objects. Conscious units do not necessarily comply with their assigned treatments and can suffer from complications such as placebo effects; moreover, humans may depart from study protocols by dropping out early, or may use the internet to interfere with each other in ways that were considered impossible in the middle of the twentieth century. The proper handling of such complexities comprises an intriguing collection of topics,which are currently virtually unstudied with any mathematical rigor.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Wednesday  15 May 2019  12:30 - 13:45

TBC

Juan Carlos Suarez Serrato (Duke University)

IFS, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE


IFS-STICERD Public Economics Seminar
Wednesday  15 May 2019  12:45 - 14:00

CANCELLED

Luke Murphy (Institute for Public Policy Research)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
Thursday  16 May 2019  14:15 - 15:45
Note change in Time


CANCELLED

Marc Henry (Penn State) , joint with ISMAšEL MOURIFIŽE, AND ROMUALD MŽEANGO

[pdf] Download Paper


We analyze the empirical content of the Roy model, stripped down to its essential features, namely sector specific unobserved heterogeneity and selfselection on the basis of potential outcomes. We characterize sharp bounds on the joint distribution of potential outcomes and testable implications of the Roy self-selection model under an instrumental constraint on the joint distribution of potential outcomes we call stochastically monotone instrumental variable (SMIV). We show that testing the Roy model selection is equivalent to testing stochastic monotonicity of observed outcomes relative to the instrument. We apply our sharp bounds to the derivation of a measure of departure from Roy self-selection to identify values of observable characteristics that induce the most costly misallocation of talent and sector and are therefore prime targets for intervention. Special emphasis is put on the case of binary outcomes, which has received little attention in the literature to date. For richer sets of outcomes, we emphasize the distinction between pointwise sharp bounds and functional sharp bounds, and its importance, when constructing sharp bounds on functional features, such as inequality measures. We analyze a Roy model of college major choice in Canada and Germany within this framework, and we take a new look at the under-representation of women in STEM.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  16 May 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Self-enforcing agreements and forward induction reasoning

Emiliano Catonini (HSE, ICEF, Moscow)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Friday  17 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

The long-run consequences of war in Sierra Leone

Tillman Hoenig (Department of Economics, LSE)

This study investigates the long-run consequences of the civil war in Sierra Leone from 1991 to 2002. Using an instrumental variable strategy with geographic instruments arising as a result of the specific characteristics of the war, I study the effects on a variety of economic outcomes. In this way, I contribute evidence to a mixed set of results exploring whether there is convergence to a no-war counterfactual in the long run after a war or not. I find that Sierra Leoneans living in areas that are highly affected by the war are far from achieving convergence ten years after the war ended. Substantial reductions in assets and household expenditures suggest that their overall economic situation is much worse than it would have been without the civil war. In particular, there seems to be a shift in the type of work they do. Households that were heavily affected by conflict are considerably less likely to work in formal wage employment and operate their own enterprise, albeit reporting higher income when their business manages to survive or is re-established. By contrast, agricultural activity is increased in high conflict areas, both at the extensive and intensive margin. This sectoral shift which is induced by the civil war and persists ten years later is in line with Collier’s view of civil war as “development in reverse”.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Monday  20 May 2019  12:00 - 13:30

A Unified Welfare Analysis of Government Policies

Nathaniel Hendren (Harvard University)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Monday  20 May 2019  12:30 - 14:00

Ownership Concentration and Strategic Supply Reduction

Ulrich Doraszelski (Wharton School) , joint with Katja Seimz, Michael Sinkinsonx, Peichun Wang

[pdf] Download Paper


We explore the implications of ownership concentration for the recently-concluded incentive auction that re-purposed spectrum from broadcast TV to mobile broadband usage in the U.S. We document significant multi-license ownership of TV stations. We show that in the reverse auction, in which TV stations bid to relinquish their licenses, multi-license owners have an incentive to withhold some TV stations to drive up prices for their remaining TV stations. Using a large-scale valuation exercise, we find that this strategic supply reduction conservatively increases payouts to TV stations by between 7.0% and 20.7%.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Industrial Organisation Seminars
Thursday  23 May 2019  14:15 - 15:45
Note change in Time


Kernel Estimation for Dyadic Data

James Powell (UC Berkeley) , joint with Bryan S. Graham and Fengshi Niu

In this forthcoming working paper we consider nonparametric estimation of density and conditional expectation functions for dyadic random variables, i.e., random variables defined for all pairs of individuals/nodes in a network of size N. These random variables are assumed to satisfy a “local dependence” property, specifically, that any random variables in the network that share one or two indices may be dependent (though random variables which do not have an index in common are assumed to be independent). Estimation of density functions for continuously-distributed random variables or regression functions for continuously-distributed regressors are proposed using straightforward application of the kernel estimation methods proposed by Rosenblatt and Parzen (for densities) or by Nadaraya and Watson (for regression functions). Estimation of their asymptotic variances is also straightforward using existing proposals for dyadic data. More unusual are the rates of convergence and asymptotic (normal) distributions for the estimators, which are shown to converge at the same rate as the (unconditional) sample mean, i.e., the square root of the number N of nodes, under standard assumptions on the kernel method. This differs from the results for nonparametric estimation of densities and regression functions for monadic data, which generally have a slower rate of convergence than the sample mean.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  23 May 2019  15:30 - 17:00

An Attention-Based Theory of Mental Accounting

Filip Matejka (CERGE-EI, Prague) , joint with Botond Koszegi

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Friday  24 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Motivating bureaucrats: Historical evidence on the impact of monetary incentives for tax inspectors

Sacha Dray (Department of Economics, LSE)

Reducing tax evasion is a key priority for many governments, particularly in developing countries. A growing literature has focused on the availability of third-party information as a critical factor to improve tax enforcement. However, there may be limits to the effectiveness of third-party information alone in improving revenue collection, particularly if other elements of enforcement are weakly enforced. Although the importance of an effective bureaucracy has been noted, its role in preventing tax evasion is less known. This project proposes to study the impact of monetary incentives to tax inspectors on tax evasion, using the hiring of “tax ferrets” in the United States from the end of the 19thcentury. These tax inspectors were charged with discovering omitted liabilities in property tax, and were paid a commission proportional to the tax revenue they generated. The identification strategy exploits variation in treatment timing due to uncertainty about the approval of these appointments by the state legislature. Preliminary results suggest that these programs were effective in raising tax revenue.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Tuesday  28 May 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Behavioral Feedback: Do Individual Choices Influence Scientific Results?

Emily Oster (Brown)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Tuesday  28 May 2019  15:30 - 17:00

The Effect of SNAP on the Composition of Purchased Foods

Jesse Shapiro (Brown University) , joint with Justine Hastings Ryan Kessler

[pdf] Download Paper


We use detailed data from a large retail panel to study the effect of participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) on the composition and nutrient content of foods purchased for at-home consumption. We find that the effect of SNAP participation is small relative to the cross-sectional variation in most of the outcomes we consider. Estimates from a model relating the composition of a household’s food purchases to the household’s current level of food spending imply that closing the gap in food spending between high-and low-SES households would not close the gap in summary measures of food healthfulness.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Psychology and Economics Seminar
Wednesday  29 May 2019  12:30 - 13:45

TBC

Florian Scheuer (University of Zurich)

IFS, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE


IFS-STICERD Public Economics Seminar
Thursday  30 May 2019  14:15 - 15:45
Note change in Time


A Pearson's Independence Test for Conditional Model Checking

Miguel Delgado (Carlos III, Madrid)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  30 May 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Coalition Formation and History Dependence

Bhaskar Dutta (University of Warwick) , joint with Hannu Vartiainen

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Friday  31 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

CANCELLED

Julia Philipp (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Monday  03 June 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Taxation and Innovation in the 20th Century

Stefanie Stantcheva (Harvard)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Wednesday  05 June 2019  12:30 - 13:45

Anti Insurance: The Perverse Targeting of Health Insurance

Lee Lockwood (University of Virginia)

IFS, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE


IFS-STICERD Public Economics Seminar
Wednesday  05 June 2019  12:45 - 14:00

Young people's earnings progression and geographic mobility

Bonang Lewis (Office for National Statistics) , joint with Tom Odell

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
Thursday  06 June 2019  14:00 - 15:30

Towards a General Large Sample Theory for Regularized Estimators

Demian Pouzo (UCL)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Econometrics Seminar Series
Thursday  06 June 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Information Choice in Auctions

Nina Bobkova (EUI, Florence)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Friday  07 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Gender Ratios and Group Interaction: Evidence from Local Parliamentary Meetings in South Korea

Martina Zanella (Department of Economics, LSE)

How does the proportion of females affect the group dynamic in a male-dominated setting? We study this question in the context of local parliamentary meetings in South Korea, exploiting the introduction of gender quotas in the elections for members of parliament (MP). The legal requirement for local parliaments to publish detailed minutes of parliamentary meetings gives us the unique opportunity to observe in a systematic manner how individuals interact. Identity economics as well as a vast literature in sociology make varied predictions of male and female behavior in male-dominated settings. For example, men may hold the view of women as threats to the norm, or they may gradually become more accepting of female colleagues. Women may cope by taking on masculine attitudes and distancing themselves from female colleagues, or they may develop solidarity among themselves. We intend to analyze the minutes of the parliamentary meetings to see how the increase in the share of female MPs affected female and male MP behavior, as measured by frequency and length of speeches, proposal and endorsement of new bills, and contention against and support for other MPs. This study may also shed light on the exact mechanisms by which gender quotas in political positions lead to female-friendly policies 1 by zooming in on the legislative process.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Monday  10 June 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Using Equity Market Reactions to Infer Exposure to Trade Liberalization

Peter Schott (Yale School of Management) , joint with the CEP/LSE International Economics Seminar Series

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Thursday  13 June 2019  15:30 - 17:00

Fostering Collaboration

Elliot Lipnowski (University of Chicago) , joint with Aditya Kuvalekar and Joyee Deb

We study optimal project selection by a firm that must choose between different workers’ preferred projects. The firm faces a basic tradeoff between fostering collaboration among its employees and efficiently adapting its decisions to its circumstances. If the firm commits to choosing the project which is most profitable ex-post, it undermines its employees’ motive to collaborate, causing ex-ante inefficiency. We solve for the firm’s optimal policy. It entails an early phase of intense competition, followed by a permanent regime of collaboration. In service to ex-ante optimality, arbitrarily severe ex-post inefficiencies must be tolerated.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Economic Theory Seminars
Friday  14 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

CANCELLED

Julia Philipp (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Monday  17 June 2019  12:00 - 13:30

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

John Van Reenen (MIT and CEP)

[pdf] Download Paper


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Wednesday  19 June 2019  12:30 - 13:45

TBC

Anna Aizer (Brown)

IFS, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE


IFS-STICERD Public Economics Seminar
Wednesday  19 June 2019  12:45 - 14:00

Pay volatility and insecure work in the UK

Daniel Tomlinson (Resolution Foundation) , joint with Lindsey Judge

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
Friday  21 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

TBC

Tatiana Torres (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


STICERD Work in Progress Seminars
Monday  24 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00
Note change in Time


Lived experience of Land Reforms in Karnataka

Soundarya Iyer (Sir Ratan Tata Fellow (2018-19))

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


LSE India Observatory Seminar


For further information please contact india.observatory@lse.ac.uk or call 020 7955 7615.
Wednesday  26 June 2019  12:30 - 13:45

TBC

Monica Costa Dias (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

IFS, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE


IFS-STICERD Public Economics Seminar
Wednesday  03 July 2019  12:45 - 14:00

What is holding back UK productivity?

Rebecca Riley (National Institute for Social and Economic Research)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
Wednesday  17 July 2019  12:45 - 14:00

Criminal justice involvement, collateral consequences and employment among women in the United States

Amanda Sheely (LSE Social Policy)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CASE Welfare Policy and Analysis Seminars
  
<<June 2019 >>
smtwtfs
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      

Click on the < < and > > symbols above to go back or forward a month.

Alternatively choose a month from below: