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STICERD Work in Progress Seminars


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These seminars are held on Fridays in term time at 13:00-14:00 in the Michio Morishima Room, 32L 3.05 (3rd floor, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH).

Entry is on a first-come first-served basis. No registration is required but places are limited. A light lunch will be available.

Seminar organisers: Sacha Dray, Amanda Dahlstrand-Rudin and Ellie Suh

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Friday  21 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

TBC

Tatiana Torres (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  03 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Evaluating the French R&D tax credit scheme

Nicholas Chanut (Department of Economics, LSE)

Tax credits to firms conducting R&D is a widespread fiscal incentive in developed countries. Since its major overhaul in 2008, the French "Research Tax Credit" has become the most generous of such schemes among OECD countries. It targets 25,000 firms annually and costs the French government more than 6 billion euros - about the same as funding for its two major research agencies. This work in progress is a first step towards evaluating the impact of this reform both on the intensive and extensive margin. We combine several sources of administrative data to link tax credit recipients to their innovation and economic outcomes. To disentangle causal effect from self-selection, we present two instruments: variations in local knowledge of the tax credit as proxied by newly established accounting firms, and differential intensity of treatment driven by researchers wage bill.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  10 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Tastes, expectations and gendered jobs: a field experiment with pink-collar men

Alexia Delfino (Department of Economics, LSE)

Taste-based and statistical discrimination theories have been extensively used to explain demand-side determinants of occupational segregation by gender and race. However, evidence on the way these forces affect the supply-side is still limited. To what extent do preferences for co-workers gender versus performance expectations affect minority's decision to apply for a job? To answer this question, I designed and implemented a nationwide recruitment experiment in collaboration with one of the main UK organizations in social care. Men's share in this job has historically been below 25%. I use random variation in emails to potential applicants to manipulate two dimensions: 1) salience of workers' gender (through a male or female photograph) and 2) performance expectations (describing the aggregate performance of two previous cohorts of workers). I find no evidence for a taste-based explanation of men's application decisions. Disclosing information that past performance was poor encourages 14% more men's applications than information of an outstanding past performance. These effects are stronger for men with limited experience in social care. Despite this initial quantity/quality trade-off, the treatment which triggers more applications also attracts men that perform better in the first month on the job. Women apply more when seeing the female than the male photograph and are insensitive to information on average, but this masks heterogeneity depending on the photograph they saw.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  17 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

The long-run consequences of war in Sierra Leone

Tillman Hoenig (Department of Economics, LSE)

This study investigates the long-run consequences of the civil war in Sierra Leone from 1991 to 2002. Using an instrumental variable strategy with geographic instruments arising as a result of the specific characteristics of the war, I study the effects on a variety of economic outcomes. In this way, I contribute evidence to a mixed set of results exploring whether there is convergence to a no-war counterfactual in the long run after a war or not. I find that Sierra Leoneans living in areas that are highly affected by the war are far from achieving convergence ten years after the war ended. Substantial reductions in assets and household expenditures suggest that their overall economic situation is much worse than it would have been without the civil war. In particular, there seems to be a shift in the type of work they do. Households that were heavily affected by conflict are considerably less likely to work in formal wage employment and operate their own enterprise, albeit reporting higher income when their business manages to survive or is re-established. By contrast, agricultural activity is increased in high conflict areas, both at the extensive and intensive margin. This sectoral shift which is induced by the civil war and persists ten years later is in line with Collier’s view of civil war as “development in reverse”.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  24 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Motivating bureaucrats: Historical evidence on the impact of monetary incentives for tax inspectors

Sacha Dray (Department of Economics, LSE)

Reducing tax evasion is a key priority for many governments, particularly in developing countries. A growing literature has focused on the availability of third-party information as a critical factor to improve tax enforcement. However, there may be limits to the effectiveness of third-party information alone in improving revenue collection, particularly if other elements of enforcement are weakly enforced. Although the importance of an effective bureaucracy has been noted, its role in preventing tax evasion is less known. This project proposes to study the impact of monetary incentives to tax inspectors on tax evasion, using the hiring of “tax ferrets” in the United States from the end of the 19thcentury. These tax inspectors were charged with discovering omitted liabilities in property tax, and were paid a commission proportional to the tax revenue they generated. The identification strategy exploits variation in treatment timing due to uncertainty about the approval of these appointments by the state legislature. Preliminary results suggest that these programs were effective in raising tax revenue.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  31 May 2019  13:00 - 14:00

CANCELLED

Julia Philipp (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  07 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

Gender Ratios and Group Interaction: Evidence from Local Parliamentary Meetings in South Korea

Martina Zanella (Department of Economics, LSE)

How does the proportion of females affect the group dynamic in a male-dominated setting? We study this question in the context of local parliamentary meetings in South Korea, exploiting the introduction of gender quotas in the elections for members of parliament (MP). The legal requirement for local parliaments to publish detailed minutes of parliamentary meetings gives us the unique opportunity to observe in a systematic manner how individuals interact. Identity economics as well as a vast literature in sociology make varied predictions of male and female behavior in male-dominated settings. For example, men may hold the view of women as threats to the norm, or they may gradually become more accepting of female colleagues. Women may cope by taking on masculine attitudes and distancing themselves from female colleagues, or they may develop solidarity among themselves. We intend to analyze the minutes of the parliamentary meetings to see how the increase in the share of female MPs affected female and male MP behavior, as measured by frequency and length of speeches, proposal and endorsement of new bills, and contention against and support for other MPs. This study may also shed light on the exact mechanisms by which gender quotas in political positions lead to female-friendly policies 1 by zooming in on the legislative process.


32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  14 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

CANCELLED

Julia Philipp (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Friday  21 June 2019  13:00 - 14:00

TBC

Tatiana Torres (Department of Social Policy, LSE)

32L 3.05, 3rd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH