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CEP-STICERD Applications Seminar


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These seminars are held on Mondays at 12:00-13:30 in room 32L 1.04 (1st floor, 32 Lincolns Inn Fields, London), unless specified otherwise.

Entry is on a first-come first-served basis. No registration is required but places are limited.

Seminar organiser: Oriana Bandiera

For further information please contact Rhoda Frith, either by email on r.m.frith@lse.ac.uk or telephone on +44(0)20 7955 6674.

Please use this link to subscribe or unsubsribe to our mailing list (applications).

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Monday  23 April 2018  12:00 - 13:30

Estimating Hospital Quality with Quasi-experimental Data

Peter Hull (Becker Friedman Institute)

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32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  30 April 2018  12:00 - 13:30

Seasonal liquidity, rural labour markets and agricultural production

Kelsey Jack (Tufts University) , joint with Günther Fink and Felix Masiye

[pdf] Download Paper [pdf] Download 2nd Paper


Many rural households in low and middle income countries continue to rely on small-scale agriculture as their primary source of income. In the absence of irrigation, income arrives only once or twice per year, and has to cover consumption and input needs until the subsequent harvest. We develop a model to show that seasonal liquidity constraints not only undermine households’ ability to smooth consumption over the cropping cycle, but also affect labour markets if liquidity-constrained farmers sell family labour off-farm to meet short-run cash needs. To identify the impact of seasonal constraints on labour allocation and agricultural production, we conducted a two-year randomized controlled trial with small-scale farmers in rural Zambia. Our results indicate that lowering the cost of accessing liquidity at the time of the year when farmers are most constrained (the lean season) reduces aggregate labour supply, drives up wages and leads to a reallocation of labour from less to more liquidity-constrained farms. This reallocation reduces consumption and income inequality among treated farmers and increases average agricultural output.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Tuesday  08 May 2018  12:00 - 13:30

The unintended consequences of “ban the box”: Statistical discrimination and employment outcomes when criminal histories are hidden.

Jennifer Doleac (University of Virginia)

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Jurisdictions across the United States have adopted “ban the box” (BTB) policies preventing employers from conducting criminal background checks until late in the job application process. Their goal is to improve employment outcomes for those with criminal records, with a secondary goal of reducing racial disparities in employment. However, removing information about job applicants’ criminal histories could lead employers who don’t want to hire ex-offenders to guess who the ex-offenders are, and avoid interviewing them. In particular, employers might avoid interviewing young, low-skilled, black and Hispanic men when criminal records are not observable, guessing that these applicants are more likely to be ex-offenders. This would exacerbate racial disparities in employment. In this paper, we use variation in the details and timing of state and local BTB policies to test BTB’s effects on employment for various demographic groups. We find that BTB policies decrease the probability of being employed by 3.4 percentage points (5.1%) for young, low-skilled black men, and by 2.3 percentage points (2.9%) for young, low-skilled Hispanic men. These findings support the hypothesis that when an applicant’s criminal history is unavailable, employers statistically discriminate against demographic groups that include more ex-offenders.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


Please note new venue
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Monday  14 May 2018  12:00 - 13:30

Changes in Social Network Structure in Response to Exposure to Formal Credit Markets

Esther Duflo (MIT) , joint with Abhijit Banerjee, Arun Chandrasekhar, and Matthew O. Jackson

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  21 May 2018  12:00 - 13:30

The Efficient Deployment of Police Resources- Theory and New Evidence from a Randomized Drunk Driving Crackdown in India

Abhijit Banerjee (MIT) , joint with Raghabendra Chattopadhyay, Esther Duflo, Daniel Keniston, and Nina Singh

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  11 June 2018  12:00 - 13:30

How Do Individuals Repay Their Debt? The Balance-Matching Heuristic

Neale Mahoney (Chicago Booth) , joint with John Gathergood, Neil Stewart and Jörg Weber

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32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
calendar
Monday  18 June 2018  12:00 - 13:30

Marriage, Labour Supply and the Dynamics of the Social Safety Net

Alessandra Voena (University of Chicago)

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32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH