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New CASE research programme:
Social policies and distributional outcomes in a changing Britain

'Social policies and distributional outcomes in a changing Britain' ("SPDO") is a major new research programme being undertaken by a team of inequalities and social policy experts at the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics in partnership with research teams at University of Manchester, Heriot Watt University and UCL Institute for Education. The research programme is funded by the Nuffield Foundation, and will be overseen by an independent Advisory Board chaired by Dame Frances Cairncross.

For more information or to sign up for the SPDO newsletter, please visit see the Social policies and distributional outcomes in a changing Britain website


News Posted: 11 January 2018      [Back to the Top]

Prospect Magazine
Dismal ignorance of the ''dismal science''—a response to Larry Elliot

In an article published in Prospect Magazine Orazio Attanasio, Oriana Bandiera, Richard Blundell, Stephen Machin, Rachel Griffith and Imran Rasul respond to Larry Elliot's recent Guardian column which criticised economics and what economists do:

"It has become routine to assault the “dismal science” with a dismal ignorance of what economics actually involves. Writers, students and even some social scientists from other disciplines who have very little exposure to what economists do are quick to point the finger and declare economics as a veil for vested interest, and dismiss it as a way of thinking that is fossilised in numbers."

The full article is re-published at https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/10282


News Posted: 23 December 2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE IQ podcast
Why is social mobility declining?

The December episode of LSE IQ podcast is now out, asking Why is social mobility declining?

Climbing the social ladder by entering an elite profession or earning lots of money is something that many of us aspire to. Yet in Britain today, how far you will progress largely depends on how well your parents did. Younger people are also facing the very real prospect of achieving less than their parents. Why is this happening?

Helping to answer the question are: Professor Mike Savage, co-director of LSE's International Inequalities Institute, Dr Abigail McKnight, associate director of LSE's Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion and Dr Sam Friedman of LSE's Department of Sociology.

Listen to the podcast via Soundcloud:

See related work:


News Posted: 05 December 2017      [Back to the Top]

Higher inequality in the UK linked to higher poverty
Double Trouble report by Abigail McKnight, Magali Duque and Mark Rucci, commissioned by Oxfam

Both inequality and poverty are now on the rise again and predicted to increase further in the next 5 to 15 years, but it has never been established if the two are directly linked. Researchers Abigail McKnight, Magali Duque and Mark Rucci explored the different types of inequality including income inequality and concentration of wealth, over the period 1961 to 2016. 

The report, Double Trouble, which was commissioned by Oxfam, shows that a positive correlation between income inequality and income poverty in the UK can be clearly established. Statistical analysis found that, on average, during the last 50 years a one point increase in income inequality - as measured using the Gini coefficient – was associated with an increase in relative poverty of 0.6 percentage points.

The report also examines the consequences of inequality, and in particular points to evidence that it leads to lower overall economic growth as well as negative consequences for some individuals and their families, and wider society. Higher levels of inequality are shown to sustain higher levels of poverty through a variety of mechanisms.  One of these is the growing polarisation between ‘the rich’ and ‘the poor’. This affects people’s perception of inequality, results in a lack of understanding about what it is like to live on a low income, and this lack of empathy has important implications for support for public policy designed to reduce inequality and tackle poverty.


News Posted: 09 November 2017      [Back to the Top]