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CEPR
Public Economics Annual Symposium 2015

The 2015 CEPR Annual Public Economics Symposium will take place on 14-15 May at the London School of Economics. It will be hosted by STICERD and co-funded by the International Growth Centre.

The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for high-quality work in public economics and to bring together economists in the field from across Europe as well as key researchers from outside the region.

This year's symposium features a keynote talk by Professor Emmanuel Saez, UC Berkeley. The symposium will also include a number of sessions devoted specifically to the theme of "public economics and development". The event provides a unique opportunity for researchers from different universities and countries to discuss their work in a relaxed atmosphere and to develop long-term collaborative relationships. It is also a great opportunity for young researchers to meet and discuss their work with senior economists.

For more information about this event please go to http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/_new/events/cepr/default.asp


News Posted: 14 May 2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Housing and Communities Event
High Rise Hope Revisited

HIGH RISE HOPE REVISITED - report LAUNCH EVENT

High Rise Hope Revisited: The social implications of upgrading the energy efficiency of large estates

Thursday 12th February 2015, 5-6.30pm, followed by a reception and networking 6.30-7.30pm. Refreshments will be served from 4.30pm

Venue: London School of Economics, 32 Lincoln’s Inn Fields: First floor Conference Room

Campus map; nearest tube station: Holborn

RSVP to lsehousingandcommunities@lse.ac.uk by 6th February.  For more information about the research or the event contact n.serle@lse.ac.uk or kayleigh.hume@rockwool.com

READ THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY HERE

READ THE FULL REPORT HERE

 

In 2012 the London School for Economics and ROCKWOOL published High Rise Hope, a path-breaking investigation into the social impact of whole building energy efficiency refurbishments in residential tower blocks.

Following this research, LSE Housing and Communities went back to the Edward Woods estate in Shepherd’s Bush, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, to re-interview residents once the upgrading work was complete. High Rise Hope Revisited highlights lessons learned and the potential social and community impact from transforming a 1960s local authority housing estate into a landmark retrofitted high rise model of social housing. The project provides many invaluable lessons for large-scale energy efficiency schemes showing how energy saving can help take millions of people out of fuel poverty, if accompanied by support and advice to help tenants cut energy use.

KEY FINDINGS INCLUDED:

• Addressing issues of fuel poverty and energy efficient improvements to the existing housing stock
• Improving quality of life and conditions in individual homes and wider estates and neighbourhoods
• Making people feel proud of the aesthetic improvements to their area and general upgrade – people feel their area compares well with others

 

Join us on the 12th February 2015 at the London School of Economics to discuss findings and lessons learned. A range of key industry figures will also be presenting on a selection of related topics around social housing, with an opportunity to network.

PROGRAMME:

• Why retrofitting high-rise makes sense 
Sunand Prasad, Senior Partner Penoyre & Prasad LLP and ex-President of RIBA

• Edward Woods estate: what can social landlords do  
Darren Snaith, Director of Refurbishment and Regeneration, ROCKWOOL UK

• High Rise Hope Revisited: what residents tell us about their community and the experience of major reinvestment, what the lessons hold for the future 
Prof. Anne Power, London School of Economics

• The long term gains of retrofitting the Edward Woods estate 
London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham

• Retrofit issues in social housing 
Andrew Eagles, Managing Director, Sustainable Homes

• Wilmcote House: What Portsmouth City Council hopes to achieve 
Steve Groves, Repairs & Maintenance Manager, Portsmouth City Council

 

For more information, see Rockwool's website:  http://www.rockwool.co.uk/solutions/facade+systems/high+rise+hope+revisited

 

 

 

 


News Posted: 30 January 2015      [Back to the Top]

CASE/SPCC Special Event
The Coalition's Social Policy Record: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015

Wednesday 28th January 2015

09.00am to 10.15am (Breakfast Briefing on Overall Findings)
10.45am to 12.30pm (Additional Presentations)

Mary Sumner House, 24 Tufton St, Westminster, SW1P 3RB (next to Westminster Abbey - see map)

Book now to secure your place at the launch of findings of a major research programme examining the Coalition's social policies and their impact. To reserve a place email: case@lse.ac.uk

Researchers from the LSE and Universities of Manchester and York will launch nine new reports including an overview of the Coalition's social policy record and separate papers on taxes and benefits; health; adult social care; under fives; further and higher education and skills; employment; housing; area regeneration:
  • The Coalition's Social Policy Record: Policy Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Area Regeneration and Neighbourhood Renewal: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Housing: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Adult Social Care: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Health: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Employment: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Further Education, Skills and Access to Higher Education: Policy, Spending and Outcomes 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Under Fives 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

  • The Coalition's Record on Cash Transfers, Poverty and Inequality 2010-2015
    Full paper| Summary

A further paper on schools will be launched on 10th February, following release of further GCSE results in late January.

Each paper contains thorough analysis of policy, spending and trends in outcomes, showing how the Coalition has tackled the fiscal and social policy challenges it faced in 2010. What has it protected from austerity measures and what has been cut? What has been the effect on services and the people receiving them? What has happened to poverty, inequality and the distribution of other social and economic outcomes? Has the government kept to its pledges to cut the deficit while protecting those most in need, radically reform the welfare state and increase social mobility? What challenges remain as further austerity looms?

Details of the event are:

08:30-09:00 Light breakfast available
09:00-10:15 Overview Briefing on the Coalition's record overall
(Ruth Lupton and John Hills)
10:15-10:45 Short break for coffee and networking
10:45-11:45 Choice of optional breakout groups covering more detailed evidence around:
  • Employment, Tax, and Benefits (Abigail McKnight and John Hills)
  • Health, Social care and Housing (Polly Vizard, Tania Burchardt and Becky Tunstall)
  • Early years, Schools, and Further and Higher Education (Kitty Stewart and Ruth Lupton)
These groups will include questions and discussion
Free copies of the individual summaries, and links to the full reports as well as copies of the summary overview report will be available.

The work is part of the Social Policy in a Cold Climate research programme, which is funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Nuffield Foundation and Trust for London. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the funders.
News Posted: 28 January 2015      [Back to the Top]

New analysis published
Poor lose, and rich gain from direct tax and benefit changes since May 2010 – without cutting the deficit

New analysis from Essex University and the LSE analyses the impact of benefit and direct tax changes since the election in detail. This shows that the poorest income groups lost the biggest share of their incomes on average, and those in the bottom half of incomes lost overall.
  • In contrast those in the top half of incomes gained from direct tax cuts, with the exception of most of the top 5 per cent – although within this 5 percent group those at the very top gained, because of the cut in the top rate of income tax.

  • In total, the changes have not contributed to cutting the deficit.  Rather, the savings from reducing benefits and tax credits have been spent on raising the tax-free income tax allowance.

  • The analysis challenges the idea that those with incomes in the top tenth have lost as great a share of their incomes as those with the lowest incomes

The full paper can be downloaded here (pdf)

The research, by Paola De Agostini, John Hills and Holly Sutherland suggests that who has gained or lost most as a result of the Coalition’s policy changes depends critically on when reforms are measured from.

  • Treasury analysis, suggesting that those at the top have lost proportionately most starts from January 2010 and therefore includes the effects of income tax changes at the top announced by Labour in 2009 and taking effect in April 2010, before the election.

  • But if the Coalition’s impacts are measured comparing the system in 2014-15 with what would have happened if the system inherited in May 2010, they have more clearly regressive effect. 

  • This resulted from the combination of: changes to benefits and tax credits making them less generous for the bottom and middle of the distribution; changes to Council Tax and benefits from which those in the bottom half lost but the top half gained; higher personal income tax allowances which meant the largest gains for those in the middle, but with some income tax increases for the top 5 per cent; and the ‘triple lock’ on state pensions which were most valuable as a proportion of their incomes for the bottom half.

  • Some groups were clear losers on average – including lone parent families, large families, children, and middle-aged people (at the age when many are parents), while others were gainers, including two-earner couples, and those in their 50s and early 60s.

Prof Sutherland, Director of EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex commented: “It is striking how seemingly technical issues or minor differences in assumptions like which tax system is taken as the starting point for Coalition reforms, or whether to assume 100% take-up of benefits have very big implications for what we conclude about whether the rich or the poor were harder hit.”  

Prof Hills, Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at LSE, commented: “What is most remarkable about these results is that the overall effect of direct tax and benefit changes under the Coalition have not contributed to cutting the deficit.  The savings from benefit reforms have been offset by the cost of raising the tax-free income tax allowance.  But those with incomes in the bottom half have lost more on average from benefit and tax credit changes than they have gained from the higher tax allowance.”

Paola De Agostini is Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex.

John Hills is Professor of Social Policy and Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at the London School of Economics.    

Holly Sutherland is Research Professor and Director of EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex. 

The paper was prepared as part of CASE’s Social Policy in a Cold Climate programme, which is funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Nuffield Foundation, and with London-specific analysis funded by the Trust for London.  The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the funders.  The analysis uses the tax-benefit model, EUROMOD, based at the University of Essex.


News Posted: 16 November 2014      [Back to the Top]