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In the media
Camille Landais and Johannes Spinnewijn's research feature in Belgian Media.


The Optimal Timing of Unemployment Benefits - Camille Landais and Johannes Spinnewijn

Camille Landais and Johannes Spinnewijn's research on unemployment benefits, published in the American Economic Review, has been discussed in the Belgian Media.

Camille and Johannes' research with Jonas Kolsrud and Peter Nilsson has explored the optimal timing of Unemployment Benefits, using evidence from Sweden. In their paper they provide a simple robust framework to evaluate the time profile of benefits paid during an unemployment spell. You can read the news items in the links below:

De Standaard, 24/09/2018

Le Soir, 24/09/2018: here and here

Related Publication
Kolsrud, Jonas, Camille Landais, Peter Nilsson, and Johannes Spinnewijn. 2018. "The Optimal Timing of Unemployment Benefits: Theory and Evidence from Sweden." American Economic Review, 108 (4-5): 985-1033. .
News Posted: 25 September 2018      [Back to the Top]

STICERD
New working paper by Robin Burgess of STICERD LSE with Benjamin Olken and Francisco Costs featured by NBER


News Posted: 05 September 2018      [Back to the Top]

Special event held as part of the Social Exclusion seminar series
What difference does devolution make for social policies and distributional outcomes?

Social Policies and Distributional Outcomes in a Changing Britain programme series

Wednesday 4th July 2018 Listen to the audio recording of the full event here

Country level devolution: Scotland

Mark Stephens Professor of Public Policy and Director, The Urban Institute, Heriot-Watt University
Suzanne Fitzpatrick Professor of Housing and Social Policy and Director, I-SPHERE, Heriot-Watt University Presentation slides here
Devolution is an increasingly important element of the landscape for social policy making in Britain and is resulting in increased divergence in social policies with potential implications for social inequalities within and across the four countries of the UK. This seminar brought together and examined recent research findings on both country-level devolution and city/region devolution and discussed the implications of the new and emerging devolved powers for social policies and distributional outcomes. Professor Mark Stephens and Professor Suzanne Fitzpatrick draw on lessons from Scotland, where powers have been extended the furthest, with a particular focus on social security, tax, housing and homelessness.


City/region level devolution: Greater Manchester

Professor Ruth Lupton Head of Inclusive Growth Analysis Unit at the University of Manchester Presentation slides here
Ruth Lupton discussed emerging evidence from Greater Manchester in policy areas such as health and social care, employment and policing, in order to establish the nature and scope of devolution in these areas and the relationship of devolution to social policy change and addressing inequalities.

The findings are the first outputs from the new CASE research programme, Social Policies and Distributional outcomes in a Changing Britain (SPDO), which is funded by Nuffield Foundation and examines the relationship between social policy making and inequalities in 21st century Britain.

 


News Posted: 04 July 2018      [Back to the Top]

CASE Special Event
The power of measurement: equality audits and frameworks. Tuesday 12 June 2-4.30pm

Speakers include: Polly Vizard (CASE), Gregory Crouch (EHRC), Abigail McKnight (CASE), Richard Laux (Race Disparity Unit) and Tania Burchardt(CASE).

Location: Room KSW1.04,London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

How well are the tools now available working in improving our understanding of inequalities?

How could they be improved?

Are they succeeding in increasing transparency and engagement with stakeholders and users more broadly?

Effective interventions to reduce inequalities depend on understanding the nature and extent of those inequalities. Frameworks, audits and other analytical tools can help, potentially allowing us to monitor progress or the lack of sufficient progress, to understand the causes, and to design of better policies.

This seminar offers a critical engagement with three current and recent models used by statutory bodies, NGOs and independent researchers in the UK and internationally to analyse and measure different aspects of social and economic inequalities.

Who is it for?

This event provides an opportunity for research, policy and NGO communities to discuss opportunities for greater collaboration in using and developing these tools.

To register for this free event please go to Eventbrite


News Posted: 24 May 2018      [Back to the Top]