London School of Economics The Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines LSE
The Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD)

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News Archive 2008

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CASE Publication
Tale of 7 Cities: A practitioner's guide to city recovery by Anne Power, Astrid Winkler, Jörg Plöger and Laura Lane

This documentary booklet based on authors' photographs and local eye-witness comments traces radical social and economic change in seven European post-industrial cities.

Their cataclysmic decline and rebuilding has put them at the heart of national and international political ferment, spurring them on to uncover new ways of doing things. They showcase how former industrial heartlands across Europe can recover. Global population pressures and continuing migration, loss of investment and global fi nancial upheaval, climate change and resource limits, pose unknown threats to the future of cities, but these cities are at the cutting edge of new solutions.

Existing infrastructure, transport connections and dense services, a tradition of invention and innovation, are leading them to pioneer exciting new ideas. Big resources are tied into these places.

In our crowded continent, existing assets are constantly redeployed to cope with new shortages. Space, energy and the natural environment are three resources that drove growth in these cities. Innovative reuse of these fi nite resources propels 'clapped out' cities back to life, while the infectious spread of new ideas drives successful experiments in urban recovery.

The seven cities share an uncertain future with the rest of the globe but Tale of 7 Cities illustrates building blocks of recovering places that may survive and indeed flourish in a more sustainable world.

Download Tale of 7 Cities , in Adobe PDF format.

You may also like to download a flyer for the publication, or read a review by Time Magazine


News Posted: 18 December 2008      [Back to the Top]

International Growth Centre (IGC) launched:
Robin Burgess is Co-Director of IGC

International Development Secretary Douglas Alexander MP today launched the new International Growth Centre (IGC), to be led by the University of Oxford and the London School of Economics (LSE), to provide practical help to promote economic growth in developing countries. The Executive Director of the Centre will be Gobind Nankani while Professor Paul Collier of the University of Oxford and Professor Robin Burgess of the LSE will be Co-Directors. Other distinguished names associated with IGC are Lord Sir Nicholas Stern and Professor Tim Besley of LSE, Professor Stefan Dercon of Oxford, Nobel Laureate Mike Spence of Stanford and Professor Kenneth Rogoff of Harvard.

The Centre will be funded by the Department for International Development (DFID), which will provide £37million over the next three years. At the launch at the LSE on 10 December, Mr Alexander described the Centre as a ‘global brains trust’, which could improve the ability of developing countries to cope with effects of the economic downturn and provide innovative research on growth.

As well as commissioning and conducting research, the Oxford-LSE hub will seek to create a global network of experts by forging partnerships with individuals, networks and institutions from all over the world. The IGC, together with its partners, will be a unique resource providing a ‘hotline’ to the advice from world experts for developing countries that need practical support on issues, such as finance, agricultural yields, the energy sector or policies for the economy as a whole.


News Posted: 10 December 2008      [Back to the Top]

Research Grant Awarded:
Henrik Kleven

Henrik Kleven has been awarded an ESRC Grant for November 2008 - November 2010 for the research project entitled “An Experimental Evaluation of Tax Evasion and Tax Enforcement in Denmark

News Posted: 01 December 2008      [Back to the Top]

Research Grant Awarded:
Gerard Padro

Gerard Padro has been awarded an ESRC First Grant in June 2008 with effect from October 2008 for the research project Strategic Risk, Civil War and Intervention: A Dynamic Global Games Approach.

News Posted: 01 December 2008      [Back to the Top]

LSE Housing Special Event
Can Existing Homes and Communities halve their CO2 Emissions? Learning from Germany's Experience

LSE Housing + Graham Research Institute

Can Existing Homes and Communities halve their CO² Emissions? Learning from Germany's Experience

Chaired by:
  • Jonathon Porritt, Chair, Sustainable Development Commission and Founder Director, Forum for the Future,

  • Colin Butfield, Head of Campaigns, WWF and Chair, Existing Homes Alliance, and

  • Anne Power, Professor of Social Policy, London School of Economics

This event took place at:

Dates and Venues:

Date: 10th December 2008
Venue: London School of Economics
Time: 9.15am - 4.30pm (registration 8.45am - 9.15am)


Download the Final Programme for this event in Adobe PDF format.

View the presentations given at this event in Adobe PDF format
News Posted: 28 November 2008      [Back to the Top]

CASEreport 57
Time and Income Poverty, Tania Burchardt

Time and money are two of the main constraints on what people can achieve in their lives. The income constraint is widely recognised by policymakers and social scientists in their concern with poverty. Analysis of the time constraint is more limited and research has often concentrated on dual-earner households, who are more likely to have relatively high incomes.

Integrating analysis of time and income reveals some who are missed by traditional poverty measures (for example, those who have to work long hours to keep their families above the poverty line), and some who are classified as time poor but who could reduce their work hours without risking income poverty.

The focus of this study is individuals who are significantly limited by time and income constraints, for example, those who could escape income poverty only by incurring time poverty, or vice versa.

A better understanding of the joint operation of these constraints has implications across a wide range of policy areas, including the drive to abolish child poverty and welfare reform, as well as employment regulations and the work/life balance.

The report is available to download at http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cr/CASEreport57.pdf

Tania will also present Time Poverty and Income Poverty at the CASE Social Exclusion Seminar on Wednesday 26 November 2008, 16:30-18:00 in R505, Michio Morishima Room, 5th Floor, LSE Research Laboratory.


News Posted: 21 November 2008      [Back to the Top]

Research Grant Awarded:
Oriana Bandiera

Oriana Bandiera has been awarded the British Academy Research Development Award for September 2008‐June 2010


News Posted: 11 November 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications:
Timothy Besley (joint with Neil Meads and Paulo Surico) ''Insiders versus Outsiders in Monetary Policymaking'' forthcoming American Economic Review (Papers and Proceedings)

A paper by Timothy Besley (joint with Neil Meads and Paulo Surico) “Insiders versus Outsiders in Monetary Policymaking” is forthcoming in  American Economic Review(Papers and Proceedings)


News Posted: 11 November 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications:
Oriana Bandiera (joint with Iwan Barankay and Imran Rasul) ''Social Connections and Incentives in the Workplace: Evidence from Personnel Data'' forthcoming Econometrica

A paper by Oriana Bandiera (joint with Iwan Barankay and Imran Rasul) “Social Connections and Incentives in the Workplace: Evidence from Personnel Data” is forthcoming in Econometrica

The authors present evidence on the effect of social connections between workers and managers on productivity in the workplace. To evaluate whether the existence of social connections is beneficial to the firm’s overall performance, they explore how the effects of social connections vary with the strength of managerial incentives and worker’s ability. To do so, they combine panel data on individual worker’s productivity from personnel records with a natural field experiment in which we engineered an exogenous change in managerial incentives, from fixed wages, to bonuses based on the average productivity of the workers managed. The authors find that when managers are paid fixed wages, they favor workers to whom they are socially connected irrespective of the worker’s ability, but when they are paid performance bonuses, they target their effort towards high ability workers irrespective of whether they are socially connected to them or not. Although social connections increase the performance of connected workers, they find that favoring connected workers is detrimental for the firm’s overall performance.


News Posted: 11 November 2008      [Back to the Top]

Journal Editorship
Maitreesh Ghatak

Starting November 2008, Maitreesh Ghatak will be taking up the position of Co-Editor of Journal of Development Economics.


News Posted: 01 November 2008      [Back to the Top]

EOPP Recent Publications: Policy Papers
Maitreesh Ghatak 'Where is Credit Due?'

Maitreesh Ghatak, in this article in Financial Express, analyses the role and functioning of credit markets in developing countries, a subject that evokes much dispute among economists. Are firms credit-constrained? How does one best measure returns to firms: as return to ability of entrepreneur or return to capital stock?

For further details see

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/where-is-credit-due/378205/


News Posted: 28 October 2008      [Back to the Top]

EOPP: Welcome new members
Dr Greg Fisher, Philippe Bracke, Nathan Foley-Fisher, Aki Ishihara, Justin Kueh, Ines Moreno-de Barreda, Sarah Sandford, Miriam Sinn, Daniel Stein, Oliver Vanden-Eynde.

We would like to extend a very warm welcome to Dr Greg Fisher, who completed his PhD from MIT, and has joined our faculty this year. We would also like to welcome all our new student members listed above. We hope you all have a very enjoyable and productive stay here!
News Posted: 27 October 2008      [Back to the Top]

EOPP Conference
CEPR annual symposium

The Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) annual symposium of the Development Economics Programme was held at the LSE, on October 3 and 4, 2008 in R505 in STICERD, which is on the 5th floor of the Lionel Robbins Building.

For more information visit the CEPR symposium website pages


News Posted: 04 October 2008      [Back to the Top]

EOPP
Remi Jedwab

Remi Jedwab is a visiting Ph.d student from the Paris School of Economics. He is visiting STICERD for one year. He is working mainly on development economics, economic geography and Sub-Saharan Africa. His website is:   http://www.pse.ens.fr/junior/jedwab/index_en.html
News Posted: 01 October 2008      [Back to the Top]

National Equality Panel
Professor John Hills appointed to head the Government's new study of inequality in the UK.

The National Equality Panel will spend a year producing an authoritative analysis of the changing gaps in British society and the complex factors which cause them.

Professor Hills, who is director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at LSE and professor of Social Policy, was asked to chair the panel of experts by Harriet Harman MP, Minister for Women and Equality.

Professor Hills said: "British society continues to be marked by great differences in the positions of different groups. However, the ways in which these are changing are complex. It will be the job of this independent panel to map these out on the basis of the most authoritative information we can compile, and to identify areas where challenges to policy remain.

"I am honoured to have been asked by Harriet Harman to take on this work, and delighted that such a distinguished group has agreed to join the panel."

The panel will be able to commission new research as well as gathering and examining data from the last 10 years. It will consider a whole range of factors which can restrict peoples' chances in life, from age, gender, disability and class to race, wealth, geography and family background.

Professor Hills said: "We know quite a bit about overall patterns of inequality but this should allow us to separate out some of the more detailed strands of inequality in Britain. For example, the fact that women tend to be paid less than men is well known but there are more complex inequalities among women themselves, according to where they live or other social circumstances."

The panel, which starts work in October, also includes CASE associate Dr Ruth Lupton, Professor Steve Machin of the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE, and six other experts.

Ms Harman said: "Equality matters more than ever and it is necessary for individuals, a peaceful society and a strong economy. To advance equality through our public policy, we need clarity of evidence and focus on the gaps in society and how they have changed over the last ten years."

Professor Hills will submit his panel's report to Government by the end of November 2009.


News Posted: 10 September 2008      [Back to the Top]

Forthcoming Publications
Henrik Kleven (joint with Claus Thustrup Kreiner and Emmanuel Saez): ''The Optimal Taxation of Couples,'' forthcoming Econometrica

A paper by Henrik Kleven (joint with Claus Thustrup Kreiner and Emmanuel Saez) The Optimal Income Taxation of Couples is forthcoming in Econometrica.

This paper explores the optimal income taxation of couples, where each couple is modeled as a unitary agent supplying labor along two dimensions: the labor supply of a primary earner and the labor supply of a secondary earner. The authors show that, if second-earner labor force participation is a signal of the couple being better off (as when second-earner entry reflects high labor market opportunities), optimal tax schemes display positive tax rates on secondary earnings along with negative jointness whereby the tax rate on one person decreases with the earnings of the spouse. Conversely, if second-earner participation is a signal of the couple being worse off (as when second-earner entry reflects low home production ability), they obtain a negative tax rate on the secondary earner along with positive jointness: the second-earner subsidy is being phased out with primary earnings. These results imply that, in either case, the tax distortion on the secondary earner is declining in primary earnings, which is therefore a general property of an optimum. The authors also prove that the second-earner tax distortion tends to zero asymptotically as primary earnings become large.
News Posted: 01 September 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications
Timothy Besley (joint with Torsten Persson): 'The Origins of State Capacity: Property Rights, Taxation and Politics', forthcoming in the American Economic Review.

A paper by Timothy Besley (joint with Torsten Persson) The Origins of State Capacity: Property Rights, Taxation and Politics is forthcoming in the American Economic Review.

Economists generally assume that the state has sufficient institutional capacity to support markets and levy taxes, assumptions which cannot be taken for granted in many states, neither historically nor in today's developing world. In this paper the authors develop a framework where "policy choices" in market regulation and taxation are constrained by past investments in the legal and fiscal capacity of the state. They study the economic and political determinants of such investments and find that legal and fiscal capacity are typically complements. Their theoretical results show that, among other things, common interest public goods, such as fighting external wars, as well as political stability and inclusive political institutions, are conducive to building state capacity of both forms. Their preliminary empirical results uncover a number of correlations in cross-country data which are consistent with the theory.
News Posted: 01 September 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications
Oriana Bandiera and Andrea Prat (joint with Tommaso Valletti): 'Active and Passive Waste in Government Spending: Evidence from a Policy Experiment', forthcoming in the American Economic Review.

A paper by Oriana Bandiera and Andrea Prat (joint with Tommaso Valletti) Active and Passive Waste in Government Spending: Evidence from a Policy Experiment is forthcoming in the American Economic Review.

The authors propose a distinction between active waste and passive waste as determinants of the cost of public services. Active waste entails utility for the public decision maker (as in the case of bribery) whereas passive waste does not (as in the case of inefficiency due to red tape). To assess the empirical relevance of both forms of waste, the authors analyze purchases of standardized goods by Italian public bodies and exploit a policy experiment associated with a national procurement agency. A revealed preference argument implies that if public bodies with higher costs are more likely to buy from the procurement agency rather than from traditional suppliers, cost differences are more likely to be due to passive waste. The authors find that: (i) Some public bodies pay systematically more than others for observationally equivalent goods and such price differences are sizeable; (ii) Differences are correlated with governance structure: the central administration pays at least 22 per cent more than semi-autonomous agencies (local government is at an intermediate level); (iii) The variation in prices across public bodies is principally due to variation in passive rather than active waste; (iv) Passive waste accounts for 83 per cent of total estimated waste.
News Posted: 01 September 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications:
Social Justice and Public Policy: Seeking fairness in diverse societies

Edited by Gary Craig, Tania Burchardt and David Gordon

Social justice is a contested term, incorporated into the language of widely differing political positions. Those on the left argue that it requires intervention from the state to ensure equality, at least of opportunity; those on the right believe that it can be underpinned by the economics of the market place with little or no state intervention. To date, political philosophers have made relatively few serious attempts to explain how a theory of social justice translates into public policy. This important book, drawing on international experience and a distinguished panel of political philosophers and social scientists, addresses what the meaning of social justice is, and how it translates into the everyday concerns of public and social policy, in the context of both multiculturalism and globalisation.

Contents: Introduction ~ Tania Burchardt and Gary Craig; Social justice and public policy: a view from political philosophy ~ Jonathan Wolff; Social justice and public policy: a social policy perspective ~ David Piachaud; Multiculturalism, social justice and the welfare state ~ Will Kymlicka; Structural injustice and the politics of difference ~ Iris Young; Recognition and voice: the challenge for social justice ~ Ruth Lister; Globalisation, social justice and the politics of aid ~ Chris Bertram; Social justice and the family ~ Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift; Children, policy and social justice ~ David Gordon; Social justice in the UK: one route or four? ~ Katie Schmuecker; Monitoring inequality: putting the capability approach to work ~ Tania Burchardt; The limits of compromise? Social justice,’ race’ and multiculturalism ~ Gary Craig; Understanding environmental justice: making the connection between sustainability, development and social justice ~ Maria Adebowale.

www.policypress.org.uk

PB £19.99 ISBN 978 1 86134 933 0 * HB £65.00 ISBN 978 1 86134 934 7 * 296 pages * June 2008

News Posted: 29 July 2008      [Back to the Top]

CASEreport 55
Report to Incommunities on the About Turn Project, Anne Power, Laura Lane and Nicola Serle

CASEreport55 is an independent account of the work of the Incommunities About Turn project to support households in difficulty with their tenancy.

The project has run for 3 years and has a track record in dealing with difficult tenancies. LSE Housing examined tenancy records, evidence from staff interviews and family development, in order to highlight how much progress has been made, what barriers and difficulties are faced now and how this work fits within the wider Bradford city and national context.

The aim of the report is to present an overview of the costs and benefits of this project from the perspective of new social priorities in the housing world and its difficulties with the most marginal tenants.

The report is available to download at http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cr/CASEreport55.pdf


News Posted: 20 July 2008      [Back to the Top]

Elected to BREAD Board
Robin Burgess and Maitreesh Ghatak

Robin Burgess and Maitreesh Ghatak have recently been elected to the Board of Directors of BREAD (Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development). Together with Tim Besley, LSE now has the maximum number of faculty members (three) in the BREAD Board. The only other institution to have three BOARD members is Harvard University.


News Posted: 24 June 2008      [Back to the Top]

LSE Housing Seminar and CASE Seminar
'Teach in' on Energy and Existing Homes: Restoring neighbourhoods and slowing climate change

'Teach in'on Energy and Existing Homes:

Restoring neighbourhoods and slowing climate change

Read the Seminar report of this event published as Paper No' CASEreport 56, July 2008 Full paper (pdf)

A seminar/workshop organised by LSE Housing and CASE, sponsored by HOME group

Dates and Venues:


Date: Friday 6th June 2008
Venue: Michio Morishima conference room (R505), 5th floor LSE Research Laboratory, Lionel Robbins Building, London School of Economics
Time: 9.00am-1.30pm (registration & breakfast 8.30-8.55am; lunch from 1.30pm)


Download the programme for this event in Adobe PDF format

View the presentations given at this event in Adobe PDF format

View photos for this event
Date: Thursday 26th June 2008
Venue: Trafford Hall, Chester
Time: 10.30am-3.15pm (registration 09.45am; lunch from 1.15pm)


Download the programme for this event in Adobe PDF format

View the presentations given at this event in Adobe PDF format

View photos for this event
Introduction

Homes already built account for 99 per cent of our total housing stock and we estimate that 86 per cent of the current stock will still be in use in 2050. Building new homes is carbon intensive and carries many wider environmental impacts. But the existing stock can be made more efficient at a reasonable cost to realise many environmental and social gains. Homes are responsible for 27 per cent of our total CO2 emissions through their energy use, half of public water use, and they generate 8 per cent of total UK waste. Large savings can be achieved using technologies that are readily available, cost effective and cheaper than many alternatives. In addition, construction waste contributes 33 per cent of the total UK waste stream.

This workshop will explore how to retrofit the existing stock. It will demonstrate the links between neighbourhood renewal, social cohesion and energy conservation and we are aiming for an interactive and topical event. Participants include managers of existing homes, regeneration companies, local authorities, and housing association as well as policy makers. The workshop will share experience on how to make the existing stock both more attractive and more energy efficient with big gains for the environment and communities.

The seminar will provide:
  • state of the art advice on how to upgrade existing buildings and homes
  • animated case studies to inspire participants and shed light on the problems
  • networking opportunities with people who are trying to tackle this difficult, but vitally important issue
  • top ideas on where to go next
Tackling resource efficiency in existing homes requires a comprehensive package of measures to deliver a step change. But the payback from implementing these changes will be great.

sponsored by Home


News Posted: 06 June 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent publication
Andrea Prat (joint with Amil Dasgupta) ''Information aggregation in financial markets with career concerns'', forthcoming in the Journal of Economic Theory.

A paper by Andrea Prat (joint with Amil Dasgupta) Information aggregation in financial markets with career concerns, is forthcoming in the Journal of Economic Theory.

Abstract: What are the equilibrium features of a dynamic financial market in which traders care about their reputation for ability? The authors modify a standard sequential trading model to include traders with career concerns. They show that this market cannot be informationally efficient: there is no equilibrium in which prices converge to the true value, even after an infinite sequence of trades. They characterize the most revealing equilibrium of this game and show that an increase in the strength of the traders’ reputational concerns has a negative effect on the extent of information that can be revealed in equilibrium but a positive effect on market liquidity.

 


News Posted: 13 May 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent publication
Oriana Bandiera (joint with Iwan Barankay and Imran Rasul) ''Social Capital in the Workplace: Evidence on its Formation and Consequences'', forthcoming in Labour Economics

A paper by Oriana Bandiera (joint with Iwan Barankay and Imran Rasul) "Social Capital in the Workplace: Evidence on its Formation and Consequences" is forthcoming in Labour Economics.

Abstract: The existence of social ties between co-workers affect many aspects of firm and worker behavior, such as how workers respond to a given set of incentives, the optimal compensation structures for workers at different tiers of the firm hierarchy, and the optimal organizational design for the firm. This paper presents evidence on the social capital in one particular firm, as embodied in the friendship ties among its workers. The authors describe the structure of the friendship network as a whole and present evidence on the determinants of social ties. Finally, they review evidence from a field experiment they conducted in the firm to highlight one particular mechanism through which social capital significantly affects worker performance.


News Posted: 13 May 2008      [Back to the Top]

Richard Ely Distinguished Lecture Series 2008
Tim Besley

Tim Besley, Director of STICERD, has been invited to give 3 lectures in the prestigious Richard Ely Distinguished Lecture Series during the week of 14th April 2008 at Johns Hopkins University. More details can be found at www.econ.jhu.edu.

 

 


News Posted: 11 April 2008      [Back to the Top]

Joseph Rowntree Foundation Report on the threat to child poverty
The impact of benefit and tax uprating on incomes and poverty

A research team including LSE's John Hills has analysed the long-term impact of current policies to uprate benefit payments and tax allowances. Far from helping to meet the government's goal of eradicating child poverty, the existing uprating rules on their own could result in child poverty rising to unprecedented levels within 20 years. For more information about this and other long term implications of this aspect of government policy see the Press release (http://www.jrf.org.uk/pressroom/releases/090408.asp), Findings (http://www.jrf.org.uk/knowledge/findings/socialpolicy/2218.asp) and full report on the Joseph Rowntree Foundation's website http://www.jrf.org.uk/bookshop/details.asp?pubID=950


News Posted: 09 April 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications
Status Incentives by Timothy Besley and Maitreesh Ghatak

"Status Incentives" by Tim Besley and Maitreesh Ghatak will be published in the American Economic Review, Papers and Proceedings, in May 2008.

Abstract: When economists study incentives in organizations, the main focus has been on using monetary payments in exchange for performance on specific measurable dimensions. But organizations use a wide variety of means to motivate their workers. One such method which has not been studied much to date, is the explicit creation of status rewards attached to good performance. In this paper, the authors consider the role of such status awards as an incentive device.
News Posted: 01 April 2008      [Back to the Top]

Book Launch
DIY Community Action: Neighbourhood Problems and Community Self-Help

Liz Richardson will launch her new publication 'DIY Community Action' - as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science - with a seminar at LSE on -

Wednesday 12th March     4.30pm to 6.00pm

- in the Michio Morishima Conference Room (R505), 5th Floor, Research Laboratory, 10 Portugal Street, London WC2A 2HD.

This event is FREE but booking is essential.

An informal drinks reception will follow this event.

To request a seat for this event, please contact
Anna Tamas Email: a.tamas@lse.ac.uk; Tel: +44(0)20-7955-6562.

About the Book
How people can be persuaded to take more control of their own lives continues to be a subject of policy and academic debate, and the contribution of active citizens to improving societal well-being is high across different policy agendas. But the promotion of community self-help raises a wide range of questions for people working in neighbourhoods, for policy makers, for politicians, and for residents themselves about how we promote engagement, what would motivate people to become active, and more fundamentally about the ongoing relevance and value of community activity.

DIY Community Action offers thought-provoking answers to these questions, based on detailed real-life evidence from over 100 community groups, each trying to combat neighbourhood problems. It presents a lively challenge to the existing thinking on contested debates, and proposes ways forward for community building.

This timely publication is an engaging resource for policy makers, practitioners, academics, students and general readers interested in exploring community engagement and active citizenship.

Liz Richardson: DIY Community Action: Neighbourhood problems and community self-help. Bristol: Policy Press.

Paperback £23.99 ISBN 9781847420848 ---- Hardback £65.00 ISBN 9781847420855

To order this book please see www.policypress.org.uk

News Posted: 12 March 2008      [Back to the Top]

Special Event
Lord Stern's Maiden Speech in the House of Lords

The text and video link to Lord Stern of Brentford's Maiden Speech last Thursday, 6 March is now available.
News Posted: 10 March 2008      [Back to the Top]

Trafford Hall Community Seminar
DIY Community Action: Neighbourhood problems and community self-help

Organised in conjunction with the University of Manchester and the London School of Economics, the 'DIY Community Action' seminar will take place on

Monday 10th - Tuesday 11th March 2008

at the National Communities Resource Centre, Trafford Hall

Ince Lane, Wimbolds Trafford, Near Chester, CH2 4JP

Community engagement is hot on the policy agenda. But the promotion of community action continues to raise a huge number of questions for people working in neighbourhoods, for policy makers, for politicians, and for residents themselves: Is it patronising residents to talk of community self-help? What legitimacy do community representatives have? What stimulates people to get involved? Does it matter that only a minority are involved? What is the relevance of community given a fast changing society? How can participatory democracy and representative democracy work together? How can we promote engagement? What relevance and value does small-scale community activity have?

This exciting seminar event offers some answers to these questions, a chance to debate the issue, see what others have done, and develop new policy and practice ideas.

Download the flyer and programme for this event in Adobe PDF format.

To book a place at this event, please contact
Chris Locker Email: c.locker@traffordhall.com; Tel: +44(0)1244 301 513

About the Book
Liz Richardson: DIY Community Action: Neighbourhood problems and community self-help. Bristol: Policy Press.

Paperback £23.99 ISBN 9781847420848 ---- Hardback £65.00 ISBN 9781847420855

To order this book please see www.policypress.org.uk

News Posted: 10 March 2008      [Back to the Top]

EOPP Conference
Polarisation and Conflict Conference

The final meeting of the Polarisation and Conflict (PAC) Project, sponsored by the Community Sixth Framework was held at STICERD on 7 and 8 March 2008. About 50 people attended and the following papers were given:

Gerald Schneider, Konstanz: The Compatibility of the Incompatible? (joint with Constanze-Sophie Braun and Nina Wiesehomeier)
Eliana La Ferrara, Bocconi: Detecting Illegal Arms Trade (joint with Stefano DellaVigna)
Oeindrila Dube, Harvard: Commodity Price Shocks and Civil Conflict: Evidence from Columbia (joint with Juan Vargas)
Timothy Besley, LSE: Civil War, Economic Development, and State Capacity (joint with Torsten Persson)
James Fearon, Stanford: Civil War Termination (joint with David Laitin)
Marta Reynal-Querol, Pompeu Fabra: The Colonial Origins of Civil War (joint with Simeon Djankov)
Saumitra Jha, Harvard: Trade, Institutions and Religious Tolerance: Evidence from India
Benjamin Olken, Harvard: Hit or Miss? The Effect of Assassinations on Institutions and Wars (joint with Ben Jones)
Edward Miguel, Berkeley: War and Local Collective Action in Sierra Leone (joint with John Bellows)
Kalle Moene, U. of Oslo: Opium for the Masses? Afghanistan as a Drug State (with Jo Thori Lind and Fredrik Willumsen)

In addition there was a presentation of PAC findings by Joan Esteban and Gerald Schneider and a Roundtable with James Fearon, Anke Hoeffler and Edward Miguel.


News Posted: 07 March 2008      [Back to the Top]

La Tribune
Saint-Étienne reste en chantier

The Weak Market Cities Programme's work on Saint-Étienne has been reported in the French press. Below is the opening paragraph from the report:

Le maire a aussi piloté le projet urbain de La Confluence, qui, à partir de 2010, accueillera logements, bureaux et espaces de loisirs là où s'étendait avant, « derrière les voűtes » de Perrache, une sorte de noman's land sinistre. Et il peut déjà annoncer la construction prochaine de trois tours de bureaux (dont une de 200 mètres) à La Part-Dieu, porter la candidature de Lyon au titre de capitale européenne de la culture en 2013, ou encore faire valoir la réhabilitation en cours du quartier de La Duchère. Tout cela en annonçant qu'il augmentera les impôts de 5%, «mais uniquement la premičre année».

A pdf copy of the full article is available here
News Posted: 05 March 2008      [Back to the Top]

CASE Publications
City Reports now out: Bilbao, Bremen, Leipzig, Saint-Étienne, Sheffield and Torino

The London School of Economics' Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) with the Brookings Metropolitan Institute developed a programme to uncover the problems besetting former industrial cities, the recovery measures under way to help these cities and their impact.

Generously funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, CASE researchers identified seven cities across Europe, embarking on impressive recovery actions to reverse decline. We wanted to establish the common ground and differences between a group of comparable cities, exploring their progress and ongoing challenges. Seven cities in five countries became partners in our work: Bremen, Saint-Étienne, Leipzig, Torino, Bilbao, Sheffield and Belfast. The five countries - Germany, Italy, France, Spain and the UK - represent nearly three quarters of the EU's population.

To download and read these city reports please go to the CASEreport site
News Posted: 04 March 2008      [Back to the Top]

LSE Housing and CASE Special Event
The American Election and the State of the American Economy

Speaker: Bruce Katz, Vice President Brookings Institution and founding director of the Metropolitan Policy Program; Visiting Professor, London School of Economics

Wednesday 27th February 4.30-6pm, followed by an informal reception

Michio Morishima Conference Room (R505), 5th floor, Lionel Robbins Building, Portugal Street, LSE, WC2A 2AE

We are delighted to welcome back Bruce Katz from the Brookings Institution who will offer his insights into the American Election and the state of the American Economy. His close involvement with Democratic politics, and city and state governments across the US will make this an exciting and up-to-the-minute seminar. Bruce Katz was Chief of Staff to Henry Cisneros (Secretary of State for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development) in the Clinton administration. He is a Visiting Professor in CASE at the London School of Economics and an ex-LSE student.

An informal drinks reception will follow this event.
This event is free but booking is essential.

To request a seat for this event, please contact Anna Tamas email: a.tamas@lse.ac.uk, tel: +44(0)20-7955-6562.


News Posted: 27 February 2008      [Back to the Top]

CASE: New Programme
Equality, Capability and Human Rights

Equality, Capability and Human Rights is a new programme of research in CASE, led by Tania Burchardt and Polly Vizard, focuses on equality and human rights. The programme aims to explore the application of these concepts in the context of Britain in the 21st century, and to develop and implement a measurement framework based on the capability approach.

For further information see the Equality, Capability and Human Rights site at http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/case/_new/research/equality/ where you can sign up for


News Posted: 12 February 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications
Robin Burgess (joint with Philippe Aghion, Stephen Redding and Fabrizio Zilibotti): ''The Unequal Effects of Liberalization: Evidence from Dismantling the License Raj in India'', forthcoming American Economic Review 2008

A paper by Robin Burgess (joint with Philippe Aghion, Stephen Redding and Fabrizio Zilibotti) "The Unequal Effects of Liberalization: Evidence from Dismantling the License Raj in India," has recently been accepted for publication in the American Economic Review 2008

The authors study whether the effects on registered manufacturing output of disman- tling the License Raj - a system of central controls regulating entry and production activity in this sector - vary across Indian states with different labor market reg- ulations. The effects are found to be unequal across Indian states with different labor market regulations. In particular, following delicensing, industries located in states with pro-employer labor market institutions grew more quickly than those in pro-worker environments.
News Posted: 22 January 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications
Henrik Kleven: 'Evaluation of Four Tax Reforms in the United States: Labour Supply and Welfare Effects for Mothers', Journal of Public Economics, 92, 2008, pp.795-816

A paper by Henrik Kleven, (joint with Nada Eissa and Claus Thustrup Kreiner) "Evaluation of Four Tax Reforms in the United States: Labour Supply and Welfare Effects for Mothers," has recently been published in the Journal of Public Economics, 2008

Summary:
An emerging consensus is that labor force participation is more responsive to taxes and transfers than hours worked. To understand the implications of participation responses for the welfare analysis of tax reform, this paper embeds this margin of labor supply in an explicit welfare theoretic framework. We apply the framework to examine the welfare effects on single mothers in the United States following four tax acts passed in 1986, 1990, 1993, and 2001.We propose a simulation method combining features of fully structural microsimulation studies and simple deadweight loss calculations. Our approach accounts for the observed heterogeneity in the microdata, but is simple to implement because we do not need to specify utility functions and estimate utility parameters.We find that each of the four tax acts created substantial welfare gains, and that the gains were concentrated almost exclusively on the participation margin. Our results imply that standard approaches not modeling the participation decision can make large errors.
News Posted: 22 January 2008      [Back to the Top]

Recent Publications
Gerard Padro-i-Miquel: The Control of Politicians in Divided Societies: The Politics of Fear, Review of Economic Studies, October 2007

A paper by Gerard Padró-i-Miquel, "The Control of Politicians in Divided Societies: The Politics of Fear," has recently been published in The Review of Economic Studies, October 2007

Autocrats in many developing countries have extracted enormous personal rents from power. In addition, they have imposed ineficient policies including pervasive patronage spending. The author presents a model in which the presence of ethnic identities and the absence of institutionalized succession processes allow the ruler to elicit support from a sizeable share of the population despite large reductions in welfare. The fear of falling under an equally ineficient and venal ruler that favors another group is enough to discipline supporters. The model predicts extensive use of patron- age, ethnic bias in taxation and spending patterns and unveils a new mechanism through which economic frictions translate into increased rent extraction by the leader. These predictions are consistent with the experiences of bad governance, ethnic bias, wasteful policies and kleptocracy in post-colonial Africa.
News Posted: 22 January 2008      [Back to the Top]

EEA President
Tim Besley elected to serve as President of the European Economic Association

Tim Besley, Kuwait Professor of Economics and Political Science, has been elected to serve as President of the European Economic Association for the period 2008-2011. Serving on the EEA's Executive Committee for a total of four years, Tim will undertake the roles of Vice President in January 2008, and then President - Elect in 2009 followed by President in 2010.

Tim will be succeeding Nick Stern who will be President in 2009.


News Posted: 18 January 2008      [Back to the Top]

IZA Award
Oriana Bandiera has been awarded the IZA Young Labour Economist Award 2007

Dr Oriana Bandiera has been awarded the IZA Young Labor Economist Award (2007) during an IZA reception held at the Annual Meetings of the Allied Social Science Associations (ASSA) in New Orleans. The award honors Dr Bandiera along with her co-authors, Iwan Barankay (University of Warwick) and Imran Rasul (University College London), for their joint paper "Social Preferences and the Response to Incentives: Evidence from Personnel Data" (Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2005).

The IZA Young Labor Economist Award is presented to young researchers who have written and published an outstanding paper in labor economics. Nominations for the award are sent by IZA Research Fellows, these are then screened by the IZA Program Directors, who each propose three papers. On the basis of these proposals, the prize-winner(s) are selected.

More information on the award can be found at http://www.iza.org/ylea.


News Posted: 18 January 2008      [Back to the Top]

Journal Editorship
Oriana Bandiera

Starting January 2008, Oriana Bandiera will be taking up the position of Co‐Editor of BE Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy and the position of Associate Editor, Economic Journal


News Posted: 01 January 2008      [Back to the Top]