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Higher inequality in the UK linked to higher poverty
Double Trouble report by Abigail McKnight, Magali Duque and Mark Rucci, commissioned by Oxfam

Both inequality and poverty are now on the rise again and predicted to increase further in the next 5 to 15 years, but it has never been established if the two are directly linked. Researchers Abigail McKnight, Magali Duque and Mark Rucci explored the different types of inequality including income inequality and concentration of wealth, over the period 1961 to 2016. 

The report, Double Trouble, which was commissioned by Oxfam, shows that a positive correlation between income inequality and income poverty in the UK can be clearly established. Statistical analysis found that, on average, during the last 50 years a one point increase in income inequality - as measured using the Gini coefficient – was associated with an increase in relative poverty of 0.6 percentage points.

The report also examines the consequences of inequality, and in particular points to evidence that it leads to lower overall economic growth as well as negative consequences for some individuals and their families, and wider society. Higher levels of inequality are shown to sustain higher levels of poverty through a variety of mechanisms.  One of these is the growing polarisation between ‘the rich’ and ‘the poor’. This affects people’s perception of inequality, results in a lack of understanding about what it is like to live on a low income, and this lack of empathy has important implications for support for public policy designed to reduce inequality and tackle poverty.


News Posted: 09 November 2017      [Back to the Top]

Help to Buy has had little impact on extending home ownership to lower income households
New blog post by Dr Bert Provan

The Government’s pledge to extend the “Help to Buy” programme is a further mistaken investment in a policy which has had little impact on extending home ownership to lower income households, explains Bert Provan. So, the £2bn investment in “social and affordable housing” is, while welcome, wholly inadequate to meet the pressing and increasing need for low cost rented housing for households in most need.  Continue reading at LSE British Politics and Policy blog


News Posted: 03 November 2017      [Back to the Top]

Race Disparity Audit
launch of Ethnicity Facts and Figures website

The UK Government’s Race Disparity Audit website 'Ethnicity Facts and Figures’ was launched today, providing some previously unavailable data. CASE researchers were engaged in the developmental process of the Audit. Measuring inequalities within and between ethnic groups has been part of our previous work on the EHRC Equality Measurement Framework that Dr Tania Burchardt and Dr Polly Vizard helped to develop, and on the work of the National Equality Panel chaired by Professor John Hills.


News Posted: 10 October 2017      [Back to the Top]

Heat, greed and human need: climate change, capitalism and sustainable wellbeing
New book by Professor Ian Gough

Wednesday November 8th at 6.30-8.00 pm followed by a wine reception

Venue: Shaw Library at London School of Economics, London

 

Professor Ian Gough (Visiting Professor, Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion, and Associate, Grantham Research Institute, LSE) presents his new book (Edward Elgar 2017).

This book builds an essential bridge between climate change and social policy. Combining ethics and human need theory with political economy and climate science, it offers a long-term, interdisciplinary analysis of the prospects for sustainable development and social justice. Beyond ‘green growth’ (which assumes an unprecedented rise in the emissions efficiency of production) it envisages two further policy stages vital for rich countries: a progressive ‘recomposition’ of consumption, and a post-growth ceiling on demand.

Please book your place at this event using Eventbrite

Chair: Professor Dame Judith Rees, Vice-chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the LSE

Discussant: Kate Raworth, Oxford University Environmental Change Institute; author of Doughnut Economics

Event hashtag: #HeatGreedHumanNeed


News Posted: 29 September 2017      [Back to the Top]