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CASE Project
Abigail McKnight

Today we are delighted to inform you that we have launched the Multidimensional Inequality Framework (MIF). The MIF and dedicated websites are the results of a collaboration between academics in the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at the London School of Economics and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) (Abigail McKnight as the academic lead), and practitioners in Oxfam (led by Alex Prats).
The initial project was funded through grant from the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity (AFSEE) programme at the LSE’s International Inequalities Institute and further funding for the development of the CASE website was provided by the LSE’s Knowledge Exchange and Impact Fund.

For too long inequality has been conceptualised and measured within single dimensions. This has limited our understanding of inequality and restricted our ability to tackle it. The Multidimensional Inequality Framework provides a systematic, theoretically grounded approach to measuring and analysing inequality. Amartya Sen's capability approach, informs the theoretical foundation of the MIF, and leads us to look beyond simple measures of economic outcomes or subjective assessments of well-being to assess the quality of people's lives. Instead, we assess inequalities in the capability of individuals to live a life they have reason to value and one that they would choose for themselves. The MIF is structured around seven key life domains, within which we provide a selection of inequality indicators and inequality measures.

The dedicated website contains a toolkit with advice on how to apply the MIF, lots of resources to help you identify inequality drivers, candidate policies and how to take action.

Visit the LSE MIF website.

News Posted: 15 July 2019      [Back to the Top]

Keynote speech at the European Conference of Social Work Research
Tania Burchardt

Dr. Tania Burchardt gave the keynote speech on 12th April 2019 at the European Conference of Social Work Research in Leuven, Belgium, on “How could a ‘capability approach’ influence social work practice?”.

The presentation slides are available here (pdf)


News Posted: 12 April 2019      [Back to the Top]

2019 Human Development and Capability Association Conference
London, 9-11 September, 2019

Hosted by University College London, in partnership with the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), Birkbeck, the University of East London (UEL) and the London International Development Centre (LIDC)

“Connecting Capabilities”

The theme for the HDCA 2019 conference in London (9-11 September 2019) is Connecting Capabilities. We have chosen this theme because we think connection is an important capability that needs further consideration.

March 2019 is the date currently scheduled for Brexit. In some ways this is a national political difficulty and time of uncertainty for the UK. But in other ways Brexit reflects themes that resonate internationally - not least the impact of globalisation and the emergence of greater xenophobia and more authoritarian forms of democracy in many parts of the world. The theme of connecting capabilities gives us an opportunity to think against this grain, using ideas and networks on human development and putting the capability approach to work in new ways.

Confirmed keynote speakers and plenary panels

  • Martha Nussbaum
  • Vandana Shiva (Sen Lecture)
  • Leif Wenar (Nussbaum Lecture)
  • Panel with activists and practitioners reflecting on using the capability approach including Gautam Bhan, Indian Institute for Human Settlements, and Johannes Krassnitzer, UNDP
Click here for the 2019 HDCA Conference Home Page for further information

News Posted: 07 January 2019      [Back to the Top]

New blog post by Bert Provan
Stop doing things to residents of poor neighbourhoods without asking what they need

These days, few organisations can escape the clamour to assess the ‘Social Return on Investment’, or SROI, of proposed new projects. But how often are local people actually asked what they need from local investment, and how realistic are the aims of delivery? Read more in Political Quarterly here


News Posted: 05 November 2018      [Back to the Top]